Posts tagged webcomics

Want more like this? Try searching the Archives for webcomics.


Permalink

reliablecomics:

80. January Again Already
I’m still working on this one, those last two panels are a little dark.
David King www.reliablecomics.com

An early look at the next Reliable Comic. David King is one of my favorite cartoonists on the planet, and takes my breath away over and over and over again. More at his site, plus his hilariously cynical Crime World strip at the excellent Study Group site. And if you’ve never read his Lemon Styles comic, it’s one of my favorite comics ever. Ever! Gush gush gush!!

reliablecomics:

80. January Again Already

I’m still working on this one, those last two panels are a little dark.

David King www.reliablecomics.com

An early look at the next Reliable Comic. David King is one of my favorite cartoonists on the planet, and takes my breath away over and over and over again. More at his site, plus his hilariously cynical Crime World strip at the excellent Study Group site. And if you’ve never read his Lemon Styles comic, it’s one of my favorite comics ever. Ever! Gush gush gush!!

Permalink

fantagraphics:

Caged heat! A new Rich Tommaso crime graphic novel, Killer in My Sleep, starts serialization at Rich’s website.

fantagraphics:

Caged heat! A new Rich Tommaso crime graphic novel, Killer in My Sleep, starts serialization at Rich’s website.

Permalink

THUNDERPAW, an ongoing animated webcomic by Jen Lee. This looks amazing. More of Jen on her Tumblr and Twitter. (via @krispiotrowski on Twitter)

THUNDERPAW, an ongoing animated webcomic by Jen Lee. This looks amazing. More of Jen on her Tumblr and Twitter. (via @krispiotrowski on Twitter)

Permalink

New on comics site What Things Do is John Pham’s comic “The Kid,” based on a well-known story about a certain stoic Australian cop (and a kid). I’ve read this thing like 40 times in the last 15 minutes, I look forward to reading it 40,000 more times. More about John right here.
Also, it bears mentioning that you can easily while away whole days browsing through the What Things Do “stacks” — they include work by a who’s who of cartoonists, including Jordan Crane, Gabrielle Bell, Sammy Harkham, Michael Deforge, Steve Weissman, Hellen Jo, on and on and on. Enjoy! 

New on comics site What Things Do is John Pham’s comic “The Kid,” based on a well-known story about a certain stoic Australian cop (and a kid). I’ve read this thing like 40 times in the last 15 minutes, I look forward to reading it 40,000 more times. More about John right here.

Also, it bears mentioning that you can easily while away whole days browsing through the What Things Do “stacks” — they include work by a who’s who of cartoonists, including Jordan Crane, Gabrielle Bell, Sammy Harkham, Michael Deforge, Steve Weissman, Hellen Jo, on and on and on. Enjoy! 
Permalink

I can’t wait for Domitille Collardey’s new Wreckhall Abbey webcomic to begin. It seems like my whole Twitter is talking about it, in between talking about the Mars robots. She’s rolling out previews very cleverly, both at the Tumblr site and via Twitter. If you’re not already familiar with her work, it’s great. 
UPDATE: the first installment’s up! 

I can’t wait for Domitille Collardey’s new Wreckhall Abbey webcomic to begin. It seems like my whole Twitter is talking about it, in between talking about the Mars robots. She’s rolling out previews very cleverly, both at the Tumblr site and via Twitter. If you’re not already familiar with her work, it’s great

UPDATE: the first installment’s up

Permalink

Oh man. Jillian Tamaki’s Supermutant Magic Academy just keeps getting better. Nothing else like it!

Oh man. Jillian Tamaki’s Supermutant Magic Academy just keeps getting better. Nothing else like it!

Permalink

Just Make Good Work by Tom McHenry of NonCanon

Just Make Good Work by Tom McHenry of NonCanon

Permalink

Amazing Facts…and Beyond! comes to an end.
Just like that, from out of nowhere, a great webcomic comes to a halt. If you’re not familiar with it, check out the archive or, better yet, buy the books and support the creators.

Amazing Facts…and Beyond! comes to an end.

Just like that, from out of nowhere, a great webcomic comes to a halt. If you’re not familiar with it, check out the archive or, better yet, buy the books and support the creators.

Permalink

Ed Piskor's book Wizzywig, about the early days of phone phreaking, comes out in comics shops this week (or so, depending on where you are). Ed originally self-published the story in three books, which sold a kind of dizzying amount for an “alternative” comic, thanks in part to a lot of attention from Boing Boing—whose audience is probably a perfect one for a story about pre-Internet social network history. 
What a lot of people might not realize is the new Top Shelf edition, collecting all three original books into one volume, was largely rewritten and redrawn from the originals. Ed re-serialized the new version as a webcomic, and that’s what’s being re-published now. Beyond the fact of it being a good book, this weird journey through various publication models is almost as interesting as the story itself, which after all features a main character who just sort of makes up his own angle on things during a time of technological flux. 
Wizzywig will be available through better comics shops everywhere (if it isn’t already), as well as through Top Shelf in both print and digital editions. And of course on Amazon, if that’s how you roll. 

Ed Piskor's book Wizzywig, about the early days of phone phreaking, comes out in comics shops this week (or so, depending on where you are). Ed originally self-published the story in three books, which sold a kind of dizzying amount for an “alternative” comic, thanks in part to a lot of attention from Boing Boing—whose audience is probably a perfect one for a story about pre-Internet social network history. 

What a lot of people might not realize is the new Top Shelf edition, collecting all three original books into one volume, was largely rewritten and redrawn from the originals. Ed re-serialized the new version as a webcomic, and that’s what’s being re-published now. Beyond the fact of it being a good book, this weird journey through various publication models is almost as interesting as the story itself, which after all features a main character who just sort of makes up his own angle on things during a time of technological flux. 

Wizzywig will be available through better comics shops everywhere (if it isn’t already), as well as through Top Shelf in both print and digital editions. And of course on Amazon, if that’s how you roll. 

Permalink

I enjoyed reading through Steven Kraan’s comics. They’re not all winners, but this one is pretty great.

I enjoyed reading through Steven Kraan’s comics. They’re not all winners, but this one is pretty great.

Permalink

Heh. (via Space Avalanche, by Eoin Ryan)

Heh. (via Space Avalanche, by Eoin Ryan)

Permalink

Nathan Bulmer strikes again.

Nathan Bulmer strikes again.

Permalink

I’ll take a wild guess and say that because you’re reading this on a comics & illustration blog, you’re already familiar with Kate Beaton’s comics. I’ll also guess, since it’s been reviewed everywhere from NPR to Time Magazine that you also already know about her new book with Drawn & Quarterly, on sale today.
I’ll refrain from reviewing the book itself, which is a nice, big, beautiful, hilarious thing because there’s not much I can say that Dustin Harbin didn’t already put so perfectly in his review.
But I did want to draw attention to the book because I know that readers of this site are cartoonists themselves, both professional and aspiring.  Kate’s book, which topped the comics and graphic novel sales chart on Amazon well before it was even released, is a notable Internet success story, and it’s worth trying to steal her secrets.
Okay, yes, talent. Talent aside — and she has it in boatloads — I think Kate’s secret is in how thoughtful a cartoonist she is. It’s a thoughtfulness that informs her work, and gives her the observational skills that allows her to capture the expressions, emotions, body language, and speech patterns of real people that makes her comics about historical and literary characters so funny.
But if you know Kate, have seen her speak, or follow her on Twitter, you’ll know it’s her thoughtfulness that also gives her autobiographical comics such heart, her thoughtfulness that gives her opinions on comics, humour, art, and culture such weight, and her thoughtfulness that makes her fans love her:

Let’s all buy her book.
EDIT: Here’s our first post about Kate from 2007.

I’ll take a wild guess and say that because you’re reading this on a comics & illustration blog, you’re already familiar with Kate Beaton’s comics. I’ll also guess, since it’s been reviewed everywhere from NPR to Time Magazine that you also already know about her new book with Drawn & Quarterly, on sale today.

I’ll refrain from reviewing the book itself, which is a nice, big, beautiful, hilarious thing because there’s not much I can say that Dustin Harbin didn’t already put so perfectly in his review.

But I did want to draw attention to the book because I know that readers of this site are cartoonists themselves, both professional and aspiring.  Kate’s book, which topped the comics and graphic novel sales chart on Amazon well before it was even released, is a notable Internet success story, and it’s worth trying to steal her secrets.

Okay, yes, talent. Talent aside — and she has it in boatloads — I think Kate’s secret is in how thoughtful a cartoonist she is. It’s a thoughtfulness that informs her work, and gives her the observational skills that allows her to capture the expressions, emotions, body language, and speech patterns of real people that makes her comics about historical and literary characters so funny.

But if you know Kate, have seen her speak, or follow her on Twitter, you’ll know it’s her thoughtfulness that also gives her autobiographical comics such heart, her thoughtfulness that gives her opinions on comics, humour, art, and culture such weight, and her thoughtfulness that makes her fans love her:

Let’s all buy her book.

EDIT: Here’s our first post about Kate from 2007.

Permalink

I continue to enjoy Nathan Bulmer’s comics over at Eat More Bikes.

Permalink

Victor Kerlow begins a space adventure webcomic, What’s in the Backpack?

Victor Kerlow begins a space adventure webcomic, What’s in the Backpack?

1 2 3 Older