Posts tagged typography

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kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?
A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 
In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.
It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 
Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.
Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?

A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 

In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.

It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 

Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.

Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

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spx:

Chris Ware’s beautiful poster art for the 2012 Small Press Expo.
I have no words.
The mega sized version lives here.

Chris Ware’s breathtaking poster for this year’s Small Press Expo. Just look at that lineup of names, and that’s not even getting into the titular “small press” exhibitors, which the show is ostensibly about. And which number includes not one but three Drawnists.

spx:

Chris Ware’s beautiful poster art for the 2012 Small Press Expo.

I have no words.

The mega sized version lives here.

Chris Ware’s breathtaking poster for this year’s Small Press Expo. Just look at that lineup of names, and that’s not even getting into the titular “small press” exhibitors, which the show is ostensibly about. And which number includes not one but three Drawnists.

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A collection of horror movie titling/logos. Via Christian Annyas of the Movie Title Stills Collection.

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Alphabetcha, a gruesome alphabet by Nathan Walker.

Alphabetcha, a gruesome alphabet by Nathan Walker.

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The Dead Words offers up creative lettering and typographical renderings of forgotten words.

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Count on Me (by Gentleman Scholar)

If this isn’t an actual Sesame Street segment (and I’m guessing it’s not) it sure should be.

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Lovely animated logotype for It’s Nice That by Animade.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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The Art of Hermann Zapf, c. 1967

(via Dustin Harbin on Twitter)

(Source: vimeo.com)

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Clever silkscreen poster by Andreas Xenoulis, illustrated using characters from the Bodoni typeface. (Purchase here)

Clever silkscreen poster by Andreas Xenoulis, illustrated using characters from the Bodoni typeface. (Purchase here)

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(via Handlettered logos from defunct department stores)
A beautiful collection of hand-rendered script lettering from old department stores.

(via Handlettered logos from defunct department stores)

A beautiful collection of hand-rendered script lettering from old department stores.

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I loved these expressive cartoon faces by Yann Le Bec even before I realized it was a hidden alphabet.
(via Yann Le Bec, illustrator)

I loved these expressive cartoon faces by Yann Le Bec even before I realized it was a hidden alphabet.

(via Yann Le Bec, illustrator)

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Peace, a beautiful new screen print from calligrapher Seb Lester.

Peace, a beautiful new screen print from calligrapher Seb Lester.

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le droit de suite (the resale right) - VA (by Pierre-Emmanuel Lyet)

A short and sweet animation about artists’ resale rights in Europe, with a very clever use of typography.

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Custom Lettering of the ’40s and ’50s

Last year’s Custom Lettering of the ’60s and ’70s, Rian Hughes’s massive scrapbook of curated lettering samples culled from movie posters, ads, and other ephemera of the time, was one my favourite books of 2010. It quickly gained a permanent spot on the bookshelf closest to my drawing table, it’s such a great reference book.

Its new successor, Custom Lettering of the ’40s and ’50s now joins it on the shelf. Both books are nothing but pure typographic pornography, carefully sorted by style and tone.

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