Posts tagged tips

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Adding Texture in Photoshop Without Affecting Colour.

tonycliff:

Since Zac Gorman asked,

1) Scan your paper or other piece of whatever you intend to use as “texture”.

2) Adjust levels etc. as necessary. Get it looking nice and even (assuming this is the effect you want).

3) Run the “High Pass” Photoshop Filter on that flattened image. Find it under FILTER > OTHER > HIGH PASS

3b) Tweak High Pass parameters as necessary. Get it just right and you win a stuffed Finn from Adventure Time.

4) Layer that High-Passed image above the layers you want to affect.

5) Set that layer’s Blend Mode to “Overlay”.

Voila. Hopefully the High Pass filter sucked out the essence of the texture you want to use. (If not, figure out another way.) Since the High Pass-ed image is mostly 50% grey, setting it to “Overlay” doesn’t mess with your image’s colour too much because I guess that’s how Overlay works. Shrug?

This Happy Little Clouds moment brought to you by Mr Tony Cliff. 

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Freelancer? How About a Three-Month “Working-Vacation?”

luclatulippe:

It’s coming up on a year since Doug and I “wintered” in Buenos Aires (we spent three months there, from mid-January to mid-April), and if any of you freelancers are thinking of doing something like this, it’s a good time to share what we learned from it. 

To refresh your memory: because we’re both self-employed, my husband and I decided we would finally take advantage of this, and spend the worst part of our cold, wet winter somewhere warm and sunny. Besides warmth and sunshine, we had two more criteria: 1) it should be a place we’ve never been before and present some fun challenges, and 2) be gay-friendly. (That last one is pretty damn big, when you consider being gay in many places means imprisonment or even death. Kinda cuts down on options.) Thus, we ended up choosing Buenos Aires. 

If you’re thinking of doing the same, here’s a small list of things I learned which I’d like to pass on to you: 

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(via luclatulippe-deactivated2013102)

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ryan-a:

Here’s a little making-of my Yakuza illustration for the exhibition, Battles without Honor and Humanity, at Floating World Comics in Portland Oregon on September 15.

Thanks to Ryan Andrews for sharing his technique on his Tumblr blog. I like his quick method of getting a simple palette. *steals it*

(via edbrisson)

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Adrian Valencia gives wonderful tips on building a portfolio, and shopping it around. These are standard, basic, important essentials. These never change. The secret is no big secret: Make the work you want to get hired for, and hit the pavement. 
Twelve years ago I was very new in London and when I decided I wanted to test myself as an illustrator, I didn’t know where to start. I spent two months building my portfolio ( let me tell you…it wasn’t amazing ) and once it was ready I took notes of art directors’ contacts from the magazines I wanted to work with. My English wasn’t great and on top of that I was clueless about the industry but in a way I guess I had nothing to lose. I had a business card and a few printed pages with my illustrations to be remembered. No website just a printed portfolio. I called every single publication in London and I was lucky that most of them agreed to meet me. (via Draw Adrian, Draw!: Once upon a time…)

Adrian Valencia gives wonderful tips on building a portfolio, and shopping it around. These are standard, basic, important essentials. These never change. The secret is no big secret: Make the work you want to get hired for, and hit the pavement. 

Twelve years ago I was very new in London and when I decided I wanted to test myself as an illustrator, I didn’t know where to start. I spent two months building my portfolio ( let me tell you…it wasn’t amazing ) and once it was ready I took notes of art directors’ contacts from the magazines I wanted to work with. My English wasn’t great and on top of that I was clueless about the industry but in a way I guess I had nothing to lose. I had a business card and a few printed pages with my illustrations to be remembered. No website just a printed portfolio. I called every single publication in London and I was lucky that most of them agreed to meet me. (via Draw Adrian, Draw!: Once upon a time…)
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Probably the most important thing I learned while filling in as an art director:

Seeing how desperate you are as an art director, when you put your trust in an illustrator - has really changed my whole perspective. And also I realized that being on time and doing professional work is 98% of what [being an illustrator] is all about.

And every once in a while you do this one great piece where the stars align and maybe it gets into American Illustration or Society of Illustration or CAA but that’s not what makes your career. I was always trying to shoot for these fantastic super-quirky weird concepts and I didn’t realize that so much of it is being professional - about being somebody that an art director can put their trust in.

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strake:

A great tip from David Lanham (designer for Astronut). If you find that sharpening a layer in Photoshop is too harsh, convert the layer to a Smart Object and apply the sharpening as a Smart Filter, but bump the opacity down. The same idea can be applied to any filter where you’d like a more subtle result.

strake:

A great tip from David Lanham (designer for Astronut). If you find that sharpening a layer in Photoshop is too harsh, convert the layer to a Smart Object and apply the sharpening as a Smart Filter, but bump the opacity down. The same idea can be applied to any filter where you’d like a more subtle result.