Posts tagged pixel art

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This Pixeljam/James Kochalka video game looks just great.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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VANALLEMEERSCH :: HCSREEMELLANAV

So at SPX a few weeks ago, Jim Rugg walked by with a giant Sam Vanallemeersch book (Big Mother #2, from Nobrow Press), which of course sold out before I could get one. Vanallemeersch is no stranger to readers of Drawn—or even me; I’ve been following his Flickr for awhile, have seen his stuff here and there, and liked it. But something about looking through that book made my hair stand up a little; nothing beats a book for a tactile, visceral experience.

So anyway, I got home and started looking him up, and found a bunch of gorgeous, frenetic, manic drawings like the one above, very much in line with what I’d responded to so much in Big Mother. But somehow I had never made the connection between Vanallemeersch’s textured, inky, organic drawing and his second “Kolchoz" style, which is an incredibly polished, shape and color-based approach. Not quite the opposite of the organic style, but a kind of mirror version. Like what if a robot, programmed with everything Vanallemeersch knows about drawing, color, and movement, then struck with some sort of divine lightning, were to create? Look at this, the first image of a eyeball-withering long horizontal scroll, on Vanallemeersch’s Kolchoz site:

It’s a beautiful drawing, right? But when I tried to open it up on my computer, I found something crazy: it’s essentially pixel art! 

Now, pixel art by itself is not such a new exciting thing. I mean, this is gorgeous and everything, sure. But as someone who draws all day, who knows a bunch of drawers, who sees drawings and makes drawings and blogs about drawings, sometimes it’s hard to get excited about drawings. But this duality, the mirroring of Sam Vanallemeersch into chaotic-but-sensible organic drawings, and these inorganic-but-insane ordered drawings—something about those two things going on in the same brain makes both more interesting. You end up looking closer at each to discern the other, does that make sense? 

The funny thing is, I emailed Sam to ask him a bunch of breathless questions, and he was appreciative but maybe not as excited about his illustration “clean” style. Which is fair, of course. Heck, you can feel anyway you like about whatever you like. But it reminds me of something I read somewhere about illustrators keeping a single sketchbook, rather than having a “work” sketchbook and a “personal” sketchbook. So all your ideas and tryouts and mistakes inform and feed each other, rather than existing in two walled cities, stagnating. Is that what Sam’s doing? I’m not sure, but if he is, there’s definitely a tunnel between the two and some trade going on; a subterranean Athens-Sparta Railroad. 

My favorite thing was this: while trying to figure out how to get screencaps of 72dpi pixel art up close, I ended up looking closely at that first image:

I love it! Art is great for looking at and learning from and talking about and all that, but there’s something really enervating and human about seeing someone’s brain at work. Definitely am looking for anything with Sam Vanallemeersch’s name on it, whether it’s the hard-to-spell regular version, or under Kolchoz. 

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Fox Retro (by PUNGA)

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bifanoland:

Post 1/10 for my “Menagerie” series.
“Menagerie” is a show of 10 polygonal animal paintings that I’ve been working on for the last three months.  It reconciles my fascination with the natural world and computer game aesthetics.
You can buy a print of this at my etsy shop.

bifanoland:

Post 1/10 for my “Menagerie” series.

“Menagerie” is a show of 10 polygonal animal paintings that I’ve been working on for the last three months.  It reconciles my fascination with the natural world and computer game aesthetics.

You can buy a print of this at my etsy shop.

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A super fun gaming-inspired music video by Mike Scott.

Be sure not to miss Mike’s making-of video in which he details the process of creating the video from start to finish. (A second making-of video of extras exists, too)

(Source: vimeo.com)

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Trexels - Star Trek Pixel Art by John Martz and Koyama Press
I made this print with Koyama Press, featuring 235 Star Trek characters in pixelated form. Can you name them all? We’re giving away two copies to the Trekkies with the best guesses. The print debuts at MoCCA in New York this weekend, and then officially goes on sale a week from today.

Trexels - Star Trek Pixel Art by John Martz and Koyama Press

I made this print with Koyama Press, featuring 235 Star Trek characters in pixelated form. Can you name them all? We’re giving away two copies to the Trekkies with the best guesses. The print debuts at MoCCA in New York this weekend, and then officially goes on sale a week from today.

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Audience Calibration Procedure (by Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery )

The latest mysterious trailer for Superbrothers’ (aka Craig Adams’s) iOS app Sword & Swocery EP. I’ve been eagerly awaiting this game. Superbrothers’ deft use of pixel art with Jim Guthrie’s music? Sign me up.

Superbrothers really understands the idea of videogames as an experience and as interactive art, as evidenced by an essay on BoingBoing I revisit frequently: Less Talk, More Rock.

I linked to it recently on my personal blog where I said:

It’s a thoughtful piece about how to communicate ideas and emotions effectively in games by eliminating the “disruptive talk” — the exposition, the hand-holding, and the noise. I think it’s a solid philosophy for all creative work.
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Toadstool Terrarium (by Jude Buffum)

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Pixel Film:Oo. (by garth+ginny)

Simple, adorable, hilarious. And there’s more where that came from. Visit Garth and Ginny’s website.