Posts tagged picture books

Want more like this? Try searching the Archives for picture books.


Permalink

There’s a lovely interview with Bob Staake over on Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast. I always love seeing process evidence, and Bob has posted a lot of it over the years. One shocker from the post is that while he planned to take 43 days to complete his 2012 follow up to 2011’sĀ Look! A Book! (not surprisingly called Look! Another Book!), it actually took him 48 days. If you have seen either of these books, you’ll be scooping your jaw off the floor along with me - that’s an incredible amount of drawing in a very short amount of time. Now I see why he is so prolific!

But the thing I’m most excited for is Staake’s new book, Bluebird, coming in April. It looks gorgeous, and the buzz makes it sound as if the story, told wordlessly, is touching and powerful as well.

And I’m sure we won’t need to wait very long for the next thing he is working on - keep up the amazing work, Bob!

Permalink

Oliver Jeffers, butcher, baker, picture book maker.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Permalink

What can you do in just four hours? Author/illustratorĀ Jarrett Krosoczka can put together a really nice TEDx talk. Here is the proof.

Permalink

Watch Brian Biggs draw the cover to his next book in the Everything Goes series: Everything Goes in the Air.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Permalink
I first became aware of Margaret Wise Brown’s work a few years after graduation, while browsing in a New York bookshop where copies of Goodnight Moon were stacked high on a table. As I read the book for the first time, unaware of the author’s legendary status within her field (or indeed anything about her) I was forcibly struck by the realization that the quietly compelling words I was saying over in my head were poetry and, what was more, poetry of a kind I prized: accessible but not predictable, emotional but purged of sentiment, vivid but so spare that every word felt necessary. Her words seemed to be rooted in the concrete but touched by an appreciation of the elusive, the paradoxical, the mysterious. There was astonishing tenderness and authority in the voice, and something mythic in it as well. It was as though the author had just now seen the world for the first time, and had chosen to honor it by taking its true measure in words.

Leonard S. Marcus, writing about Margaret Wise Brown, from the introduction to his biography on the Goodnight Moon author, Awakened by the Moon

If there’s a better definition for the quality of writing that makes a picture book great, I’d like to hear it.

(via BookLust)

Permalink

I love seeing skilled craftspeople at their work. This great picture book is screen printed white ink on craft paper, hand-folded and hand-bound, made in the tradition of Warli art from West India. And it looks gorgeous! You can buy a copy here.

(via CHILDREN’S ILLUSTRATION: Do!)

Permalink

Preach it!

Permalink
The picture book is the best field for an illustrator.