Posts tagged painting

Want more like this? Try searching the Archives for painting.


Permalink

luclatulippe:

illustratedvancouver:

Driveway, 2012 by John Ogilvy offers a dramatic perspective in this 40”x50” oil on canvas, currently on exhibit at the Ian Tan Gallery until November 29th. AND THE CRAWL STARTS TODAY!

WHOA! Lovely work by painter John Ogilvy, and you can almost see my apartment in there.

EDIT (1:12 pm): Visit John Ogilivy’s website.

luclatulippe:

illustratedvancouver:

Driveway, 2012 by John Ogilvy offers a dramatic perspective in this 40”x50” oil on canvas, currently on exhibit at the Ian Tan Gallery until November 29th. AND THE CRAWL STARTS TODAY!

WHOA! Lovely work by painter John Ogilvy, and you can almost see my apartment in there.

EDIT (1:12 pm): Visit John Ogilivy’s website.

(via luclatulippe-deactivated2013102)

Permalink

Yao Yao, from Behance.

Yao Yao, from Behance.

Permalink

Mike Yamada, Visual Development Artist at Dreamworks Animation. I want to go to there.

Mike Yamada, Visual Development Artist at Dreamworks Animation. I want to go to there.

Permalink

Jillian Tamaki takes my breath away. In her words:

A 6-page visual essay for Print Magazine's “Trash” issue. Over about four weeks in April, I surveyed lost, abandoned, and discarded items on three blocks surrounding my apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The “trash” ranged from the mundane to the bizarre to the seemingly-poetic.

Click through to see the full post, which is beautifully drawn, beautifully painted, and beautifully paced. *sigh*

Jillian Tamaki takes my breath away. In her words:

A 6-page visual essay for Print Magazine's “Trash” issue. Over about four weeks in April, I surveyed lost, abandoned, and discarded items on three blocks surrounding my apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The “trash” ranged from the mundane to the bizarre to the seemingly-poetic.

Click through to see the full post, which is beautifully drawn, beautifully painted, and beautifully paced. *sigh*

Permalink

sirmitchell:

And a bit of a progress GIF. 

Mike Mitchell doesn’t need much introduction — he’s best known for his pop culture -inflected illustrations, but I’m really loving him flexing his digital painting chops on this series of fat birds. One of the things that sets him apart as an artist is his ability to maintain a throughline in his work, whether it’s an 80’s video game character or a fat barn swallow. Side bonus for followers of his Tumblr are his occasional astronomical photographs, like this one. 

sirmitchell:

And a bit of a progress GIF. 

Mike Mitchell doesn’t need much introduction — he’s best known for his pop culture -inflected illustrations, but I’m really loving him flexing his digital painting chops on this series of fat birds. One of the things that sets him apart as an artist is his ability to maintain a throughline in his work, whether it’s an 80’s video game character or a fat barn swallow. Side bonus for followers of his Tumblr are his occasional astronomical photographs, like this one

Permalink

peira:

Felix Vallotton:  First Rays (1921) via The Athenaeum

Stunning colours! I actually gasped when I saw this one. I know, it’s more “fine art” than “illustration” but it still has very illustrative qualities (sorry Fine Artists, I know some of you hate that term). I could stare at this all day long. 

peira:

Felix Vallotton:  First Rays (1921) via The Athenaeum

Stunning colours! I actually gasped when I saw this one. I know, it’s more “fine art” than “illustration” but it still has very illustrative qualities (sorry Fine Artists, I know some of you hate that term). I could stare at this all day long. 

Permalink

WikiPaintings - a searchable, sortable wiki of classic and public domain paintings.

WikiPaintings - a searchable, sortable wiki of classic and public domain paintings.

Permalink

lesstalkmorepaint:

Potatoshop, pixels on cintiq.

By Frazer Irving, from the new group painting blog Less Talk, More Paint featuring Ray Fawkes, Stephanie Buscema, Frazer Irving, Stuart Immonen, Camilla D’Errico, and Karl Kerschl.

lesstalkmorepaint:

Potatoshop, pixels on cintiq.

By Frazer Irving, from the new group painting blog Less Talk, More Paint featuring Ray Fawkes, Stephanie Buscema, Frazer Irving, Stuart Immonen, Camilla D’Errico, and Karl Kerschl.

Permalink

illustratedvancouver:

University of British Columbia Campus by James Hill, another grand Maclean’s magazine cover image from the 1950s. Published March 31, 1956, it depicts the hustle and bustle of the end of the school year, but could just as easily be applied to the end of the fall semester. This blog post (and comment stream) is a testament to his career, and an impressive body of his illustrations can be seen in this photoset. [More…]

James Hill, 1956, Vancouver. Read this post in its entirety here.

illustratedvancouver:

University of British Columbia Campus by James Hill, another grand Maclean’s magazine cover image from the 1950s. Published March 31, 1956, it depicts the hustle and bustle of the end of the school year, but could just as easily be applied to the end of the fall semester. This blog post (and comment stream) is a testament to his career, and an impressive body of his illustrations can be seen in this photoset. [More…]

James Hill, 1956, Vancouver. Read this post in its entirety here.

Permalink

"Moonshine: Artists after dark" is a short, enjoyable documentary showcasing the personal work of several artists who work at DreamWorks. 

Permalink

Bruce White paints black velvet paintings for your inner nerd.

Permalink

In the summer of 1950, Hans Namuth approached Jackson Pollock and asked the abstract expressionist painter if he could photograph him in his studio, working with his “drip” technique of painting. When Namuth arrived, he found:

A dripping wet canvas covered the entire floor. Blinding shafts of sunlight hit the wet canvas, making its surface hard to see. There was complete silence…. Pollock looked at the painting. Then unexpectedly, he picked up can and paintbrush and started to move around the canvas. It was as if he suddenly realized the painting was not finished. His movements, slow at first, gradually became faster and more dancelike as he flung black, white and rust-colored paint onto the canvas.

The images from this shoot “helped transform Pollock from a talented, cranky loner into the first media-driven superstar of American contemporary art, the jeans-clad, chain-smoking poster boy of abstract expressionism,” one critic later wrote in The Washington Post. But Namuth wasn’t satisfied that he had really captured the essence of Pollock’s work. He wanted to capture Pollock in motion and color, to focus on the painter and painting alike.

Above, you can watch the result of Namuth’s second effort. The ten-minute film, simply called Jackson Pollock 51 (the 51 being short for 1951), lets you see Pollock painting from a unique angle — through glass. The film achieved Namuth’s aesthetic goals, but it came at a price. Apparently the filming taxed Pollock emotionally, and by the evening, the painter decided to pour himself some bourbon, his first drink in two years. A blowout argument followed; Pollock never stopped drinking again; and it was downhill from there…

(via Jackson Pollock: Lights, Camera, Paint! (1951) | Open Culture)

Permalink

Drawn mega-pal Meg Hunt has posted a gorgeous short video of her solo show, Cosmic Forest, currently up at Portland’s Land Gallery. I had the great fortune of seeing the show in-person last weekend, and… well, it’s hard not to gush over a friend’s work anyway, but this show truly is superb. Meg’s linework and drybrush and colors (the colors!) and the tantalizing tease of a narrative that drifts across the collection of work is just awesome.

If you’re in Portland or nearby, make the trip before the show comes down! If you’re too far to see it with your eyeballs, don’t miss Meg’s Flickr set, linked below.

paperalligator:

Okay! So it’s a lovely Friday in Portland and one week later, I have lots of documentation from Cosmic Forest, including the video above. Again, all this stuff was shot by my awesome intern, and it’s a lot of fun to see stuff in motion. If nothing else, it was a perfect summer show.

Permalink

bifanoland:

Post 1/10 for my “Menagerie” series.
“Menagerie” is a show of 10 polygonal animal paintings that I’ve been working on for the last three months.  It reconciles my fascination with the natural world and computer game aesthetics.
You can buy a print of this at my etsy shop.

bifanoland:

Post 1/10 for my “Menagerie” series.

“Menagerie” is a show of 10 polygonal animal paintings that I’ve been working on for the last three months.  It reconciles my fascination with the natural world and computer game aesthetics.

You can buy a print of this at my etsy shop.

Permalink

You guys, Jacqui Oakley's work is stunning. Just beautiful. She's on the Dribbble and the Twitter too. 

You guys, Jacqui Oakley's work is stunning. Just beautiful. She's on the Dribbble and the Twitter too. 

1 2 Older