Posts tagged magazines

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I had the strangest mix of experiences the other day, collapsing together not only my interests with my four-year-old daughter’s, but we also ran a technological gamut in order to assemble the experience’s various components.
We began with a walk through a local antique store, and for the first time my daughter seemed ready to explore the shelves for something of her own to covet and purchase. When we discovered a pile of Jack and Jill magazines from the late 1960s/early 1970s, I was attracted to the great illustrations, and my daughter was looking at all the interesting puzzles and mazes. As a kid, I was always a Ranger Rick kind of guy, since I was interested more specifically in animals and nature, but this particular Jack and Jill issue from May 1969 may have converted me. We bought the above copy, and two other Jack and Jills.
When we got home, my daughter, having noticed my interest in this particular issue, asked me to read about the picture on the cover. The cover story is something of a self-interview of Walt Kelly and the history of the Pogo comic strip, told through the eponymous opossum, Pogo. In addition to a somewhat detailed, high-level summary of the plate-making and printing process, full of toxic chemicals like zinc and asbestos and all, the article taught me a few things: the strip originally focussed on a little boy and Albert Alligator in a fiercer form, with Pogo playing a smaller role; the comic spent six years in books before it became a syndicated newspaper strip in 1949; Kelly created over 150 different characters for the strip; and on May 18, 1969, NBC aired a cartoon of all these wonderful critters, in a story about celebrating whatever your favorite holiday is, any time of year.
Our interest was peaked. The future has arrived, so I pulled my phone from my pocket and searched for “Walt Kelly Pogo animation”, and sure enough, this wonderful Chuck Jones-directed story popped up right at the top.
So: my daughter and I wandered through an antique store, found a musty, 43-year-old magazine, read about the history of a newspaper comic strip that was once made into an animated cartoon, which we looked up and watched on my phone, and we both loved every second of it all. It was a far better weekend outing than I expected.

I had the strangest mix of experiences the other day, collapsing together not only my interests with my four-year-old daughter’s, but we also ran a technological gamut in order to assemble the experience’s various components.

We began with a walk through a local antique store, and for the first time my daughter seemed ready to explore the shelves for something of her own to covet and purchase. When we discovered a pile of Jack and Jill magazines from the late 1960s/early 1970s, I was attracted to the great illustrations, and my daughter was looking at all the interesting puzzles and mazes. As a kid, I was always a Ranger Rick kind of guy, since I was interested more specifically in animals and nature, but this particular Jack and Jill issue from May 1969 may have converted me. We bought the above copy, and two other Jack and Jills.

When we got home, my daughter, having noticed my interest in this particular issue, asked me to read about the picture on the cover. The cover story is something of a self-interview of Walt Kelly and the history of the Pogo comic strip, told through the eponymous opossum, Pogo. In addition to a somewhat detailed, high-level summary of the plate-making and printing process, full of toxic chemicals like zinc and asbestos and all, the article taught me a few things: the strip originally focussed on a little boy and Albert Alligator in a fiercer form, with Pogo playing a smaller role; the comic spent six years in books before it became a syndicated newspaper strip in 1949; Kelly created over 150 different characters for the strip; and on May 18, 1969, NBC aired a cartoon of all these wonderful critters, in a story about celebrating whatever your favorite holiday is, any time of year.

Our interest was peaked. The future has arrived, so I pulled my phone from my pocket and searched for “Walt Kelly Pogo animation”, and sure enough, this wonderful Chuck Jones-directed story popped up right at the top.

So: my daughter and I wandered through an antique store, found a musty, 43-year-old magazine, read about the history of a newspaper comic strip that was once made into an animated cartoon, which we looked up and watched on my phone, and we both loved every second of it all. It was a far better weekend outing than I expected.

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Jillian Tamaki takes my breath away. In her words:

A 6-page visual essay for Print Magazine's “Trash” issue. Over about four weeks in April, I surveyed lost, abandoned, and discarded items on three blocks surrounding my apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The “trash” ranged from the mundane to the bizarre to the seemingly-poetic.

Click through to see the full post, which is beautifully drawn, beautifully painted, and beautifully paced. *sigh*

Jillian Tamaki takes my breath away. In her words:

A 6-page visual essay for Print Magazine's “Trash” issue. Over about four weeks in April, I surveyed lost, abandoned, and discarded items on three blocks surrounding my apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The “trash” ranged from the mundane to the bizarre to the seemingly-poetic.

Click through to see the full post, which is beautifully drawn, beautifully painted, and beautifully paced. *sigh*

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New database of Victorian magazines

This is a new database being built by people at Ryerson University in Toronto. They are digitizing The Yellow Book and other Victorian magazines, with links to related scholarly resources. Yellow Book is where Aubrey Beardsley really made his work known. Keep checking back over the coming months and years for more.

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Jillian Tamaki reminds us there was a time when Maclean’s actually used illustrations on their covers (this cover was by Oscar Cahen). I don’t think I’ve ever seen them use an illustrated cover in my 41 years. (By the way, this is me dropping a gigantic hint to whomever is the Art Director there right now.)

Jillian Tamaki reminds us there was a time when Maclean’s actually used illustrations on their covers (this cover was by Oscar Cahen). I don’t think I’ve ever seen them use an illustrated cover in my 41 years. (By the way, this is me dropping a gigantic hint to whomever is the Art Director there right now.)

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Subtraction.com: My iPad Magazine Stand

Former NYTimes.com designer Khoi Vinh on magazines formatted for iPads and tablets.

In a media world that looks increasingly like the busy downtown heart of a city — with innumerable activities, events and alternative sources of distraction around you — these apps demand that you confine yourself to a remote, suburban cul-de-sac.