Posts tagged inspiration

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Drawing is one of the most human things you can possibly do.

Phil McAndrew: Draw Like a Six-Year-Old

Speckled with Phil’s awesome drawings, this longish read is worth every word!

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Ana Albero 

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heyoscarwilde:

The Idea Dictates Everything
A David Lynch speech circa 2005 captured and illustrated by John Hoffman :: via monkeyfeather.blogspot.ca

heyoscarwilde:

The Idea Dictates Everything

A David Lynch speech circa 2005 captured and illustrated by John Hoffman :: via monkeyfeather.blogspot.ca

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Fantastic vintage, scratchy, halftone-y, colorful, off-register, lush goodness from CSA in the form of CSA Flat File. Inspirationy!
(via Corey Loven)

Fantastic vintage, scratchy, halftone-y, colorful, off-register, lush goodness from CSA in the form of CSA Flat File. Inspirationy!

(via Corey Loven)

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Yesterday I tweeted about some problems I was having on a job, and someone (thank you!) sent me this link as inspiration. The page lists dozens of wonderful old comics’ splash pages (and covers) that integrated mastheads and titles into the layout, rather than just having it sit there, essentially obscuring the illustration behind it. Obviously, Will Eisner did this better than anyone else. The one I picked here is one of the cleverest I’ve ever seen. Look at that. Knocks me out. So lovely. 

…everything changed with the appearance of Will Eisner’s “The Spirit” (1940). ”The Spirit” was published as a seven-page supplement to the comics section of American Sunday newspapers. As a supplement tucked inside newspapers, “The Spirit” did not depend on being visible on the newsstands. It was not limited by the need for recognizable branding like “Superman.” Not only did he change the masthead of “The Spirit” for every issue, but very soon, the masthead became an integral part of the scene/set. (via Spirit of the Stone Type — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers)

The author posted an entire set of these on Flickr with over 75 examples. 

Yesterday I tweeted about some problems I was having on a job, and someone (thank you!) sent me this link as inspiration. The page lists dozens of wonderful old comics’ splash pages (and covers) that integrated mastheads and titles into the layout, rather than just having it sit there, essentially obscuring the illustration behind it. Obviously, Will Eisner did this better than anyone else. The one I picked here is one of the cleverest I’ve ever seen. Look at that. Knocks me out. So lovely. 

…everything changed with the appearance of Will Eisner’s “The Spirit” (1940). ”The Spirit” was published as a seven-page supplement to the comics section of American Sunday newspapers. As a supplement tucked inside newspapers, “The Spirit” did not depend on being visible on the newsstands. It was not limited by the need for recognizable branding like “Superman.” Not only did he change the masthead of “The Spirit” for every issue, but very soon, the masthead became an integral part of the scene/set. (via Spirit of the Stone Type — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers)

The author posted an entire set of these on Flickr with over 75 examples. 

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The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself. Things occur to you. If you’re sitting around trying to dream up a great art idea, you can sit there a long time before anything happens. But if you just get to work, something will occur to you and something else will occur to you and somthing else that you reject will push you in another direction. Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case.
Chuck Close (via sandyhong & @emilycarroll)

(via ashwara)

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Book recommendation: Orbiting the Giant Hairball

I’m the last person to cozy up with a self-help book, but last week a friend recommended Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool’s Guide to Surviving with Grace, by Gordon MacKenzie. I finished it in one sitting (not because it’s short, but because it’s great).

MacKenzie was Hallmark’s “self-stylized holy man with the title of Creative Paradox” and the founder of their Humor Workshop. In the book he shares lively anecdotes from his long career there, and finds lessons for us creative types afraid of having the spark of genius squelched by stolid corporate bureaucracies (aka hairballs).

If you have a job in the creative branch of an enormous corporation (like Hallmark, or Disney, or EA), you need to read this, and better yet, buy it for your corporate superiors this holiday season.

Here’s a 1997 Fast Company interview with MacKenzie, which will give you a taste of his style and philosophy.

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INCIDENTAL COMICS: The Blank Page

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Frank Chimero - How to Have an Idea

A great, comic-like illustration of an industrious approach to the creative process.

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1. Make stuff. 2. Show it to people.