Posts tagged illustration

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ryan-a:

Here’s a little making-of my Yakuza illustration for the exhibition, Battles without Honor and Humanity, at Floating World Comics in Portland Oregon on September 15.

Thanks to Ryan Andrews for sharing his technique on his Tumblr blog. I like his quick method of getting a simple palette. *steals it*

(via edbrisson)

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nevver:

Victo Ngai


Lovely work!

nevver:

Victo Ngai

Lovely work!

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Love this Halloween pinup by illustrator Britt Sanders. More of her work at her site.  I’m not even really that into Halloween, but I’ve really been enjoying the burst of creativity the holiday brings out in artists around the internet. 

Love this Halloween pinup by illustrator Britt Sanders. More of her work at her site.  I’m not even really that into Halloween, but I’ve really been enjoying the burst of creativity the holiday brings out in artists around the internet. 

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victongai:

Tough Calls
Victo Ngai
Latest piece for Plansponsor magazine about the tension in choosing -one needs to give up something in order to gain. Big big thanks to AD SooJin! 

This appeared on my dashboard this morning, via the tirelessly interesting This Isn’t Happiness tumblr, and holy moly Victo Ngai

victongai:

Tough Calls

Victo Ngai

Latest piece for Plansponsor magazine about the tension in choosing -one needs to give up something in order to gain. Big big thanks to AD SooJin! 

This appeared on my dashboard this morning, via the tirelessly interesting This Isn’t Happiness tumblr, and holy moly Victo Ngai

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I may never grow tired of monster and creature illustrations integrated into real-life photo settings, like these from Juan Carlos Paz Gómez’s Flickr stream.

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Love this comic drawn by Mikkel Sommer, a freelance illustrator and comic book artist out of Berlin. Bonus image!

Comic was written by Alex Spiro for Nobrow 7: Brave New World.

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sirmitchell:

My Iron Giant poster being released by Mondo today at NYCC.
You can see the variant edition here.

Holy moly frijole cannoli! Mike Mitchell, again for the win. 

sirmitchell:

My Iron Giant poster being released by Mondo today at NYCC.

You can see the variant edition here.

Holy moly frijole cannoli! Mike Mitchell, again for the win. 

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September Mood by Margaux Motin

September Mood by Margaux Motin

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radiomaru:

A nice person teaching at CalArts did an anatomy lesson and included examples from me and Meredith Gran and others.

See, I … I know what i’m… i’m … doing….

http://stulivingston.blogspot.com/2012/10/life-drawing-for-animation-demoz.html

We are in a golden age of comics and cartoonists being embraced by smart people in academia. To those learning comics now as young people, enjoy this privilege that no other generation before yours has enjoyed! 

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VANALLEMEERSCH :: HCSREEMELLANAV

So at SPX a few weeks ago, Jim Rugg walked by with a giant Sam Vanallemeersch book (Big Mother #2, from Nobrow Press), which of course sold out before I could get one. Vanallemeersch is no stranger to readers of Drawn—or even me; I’ve been following his Flickr for awhile, have seen his stuff here and there, and liked it. But something about looking through that book made my hair stand up a little; nothing beats a book for a tactile, visceral experience.

So anyway, I got home and started looking him up, and found a bunch of gorgeous, frenetic, manic drawings like the one above, very much in line with what I’d responded to so much in Big Mother. But somehow I had never made the connection between Vanallemeersch’s textured, inky, organic drawing and his second “Kolchoz" style, which is an incredibly polished, shape and color-based approach. Not quite the opposite of the organic style, but a kind of mirror version. Like what if a robot, programmed with everything Vanallemeersch knows about drawing, color, and movement, then struck with some sort of divine lightning, were to create? Look at this, the first image of a eyeball-withering long horizontal scroll, on Vanallemeersch’s Kolchoz site:

It’s a beautiful drawing, right? But when I tried to open it up on my computer, I found something crazy: it’s essentially pixel art! 

Now, pixel art by itself is not such a new exciting thing. I mean, this is gorgeous and everything, sure. But as someone who draws all day, who knows a bunch of drawers, who sees drawings and makes drawings and blogs about drawings, sometimes it’s hard to get excited about drawings. But this duality, the mirroring of Sam Vanallemeersch into chaotic-but-sensible organic drawings, and these inorganic-but-insane ordered drawings—something about those two things going on in the same brain makes both more interesting. You end up looking closer at each to discern the other, does that make sense? 

The funny thing is, I emailed Sam to ask him a bunch of breathless questions, and he was appreciative but maybe not as excited about his illustration “clean” style. Which is fair, of course. Heck, you can feel anyway you like about whatever you like. But it reminds me of something I read somewhere about illustrators keeping a single sketchbook, rather than having a “work” sketchbook and a “personal” sketchbook. So all your ideas and tryouts and mistakes inform and feed each other, rather than existing in two walled cities, stagnating. Is that what Sam’s doing? I’m not sure, but if he is, there’s definitely a tunnel between the two and some trade going on; a subterranean Athens-Sparta Railroad. 

My favorite thing was this: while trying to figure out how to get screencaps of 72dpi pixel art up close, I ended up looking closely at that first image:

I love it! Art is great for looking at and learning from and talking about and all that, but there’s something really enervating and human about seeing someone’s brain at work. Definitely am looking for anything with Sam Vanallemeersch’s name on it, whether it’s the hard-to-spell regular version, or under Kolchoz. 

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I love the monsters and aliens of www.diaryofinhumanspecies.com. They’re drawn by Grograou, out of Pennsylvania (maybe)…and that’s all I could dig up on him. He also designed this great monster toy.

Follow here: twitter, flickr and blog.

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wishbow:

Having a crappy, hectic week. In order to cheer me up, have a sneak peek at the cover I did for this week’s Newcity cover. 

Pam Wishbow’s work is so fun and lively. Hard to believe this illustration came from her having a bad week! Well done!

wishbow:

Having a crappy, hectic week. In order to cheer me up, have a sneak peek at the cover I did for this week’s Newcity cover. 

Pam Wishbow’s work is so fun and lively. Hard to believe this illustration came from her having a bad week! Well done!

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Pinup (by Matthew Houston)

Pinup (by Matthew Houston)

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About a dozen Google Maps illustrations by Christoph Neimann, all of them pretty damn brilliant. (via Abduzeedo)

About a dozen Google Maps illustrations by Christoph Neimann, all of them pretty damn brilliant. (via Abduzeedo)

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Know who this is? When? Where? What? Why it matters? 
There has never been a proper textbook on the history of illustration. It’s important, not just for training students but for representing the field and its legacy to the world.
In order to help get a textbook going, I have written a SURVEY to help determine the content, scope, format, and tone of a potential textbook. Whitney Sherman, an instructor at the Maryland Institute College of Art, co-authored the SURVEY, and it was checked over by a range of qualified people. We don’t have plans to write one ourselves - we just see the need for information for whoever does. The  New York Society of Illustrators is sponsoring this SURVEY.
Now it’s YOUR turn - have your say, as a teacher, student, collector, or scholar:
SURVEY
Oh, and it’s Arthur William Brown, circa 1945, New York, unidentified model, and it’s important because Brown was one of the biggest promoters of illustration in his day and a big influence on the evolution of sexualized beauty standards, for better and worse. Original on file at Society of Illustrators.

Know who this is? When? Where? What? Why it matters?

There has never been a proper textbook on the history of illustration. It’s important, not just for training students but for representing the field and its legacy to the world.

In order to help get a textbook going, I have written a SURVEY to help determine the content, scope, format, and tone of a potential textbook. Whitney Sherman, an instructor at the Maryland Institute College of Art, co-authored the SURVEY, and it was checked over by a range of qualified people. We don’t have plans to write one ourselves - we just see the need for information for whoever does. The  New York Society of Illustrators is sponsoring this SURVEY.

Now it’s YOUR turn - have your say, as a teacher, student, collector, or scholar:

SURVEY

Oh, and it’s Arthur William Brown, circa 1945, New York, unidentified model, and it’s important because Brown was one of the biggest promoters of illustration in his day and a big influence on the evolution of sexualized beauty standards, for better and worse. Original on file at Society of Illustrators.