Posts tagged iPad

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luclatulippe:

Speaking of vector program alternatives, I was also told about iDraw by illustrator George Coghill (he’s been using it for a while now). iDraw seems quite feature-rich and offers both a desktop version ($25) and an iPad app ($9). Yes, $25 for a desktop vector program. Are you listening Adobe??

luclatulippe:

Speaking of vector program alternatives, I was also told about iDraw by illustrator George Coghill (he’s been using it for a while now). iDraw seems quite feature-rich and offers both a desktop version ($25) and an iPad app ($9). Yes, $25 for a desktop vector program. Are you listening Adobe??

(via luclatulippe-deactivated2013102)

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A better vector app for the iPad?

That’s what illustrator Ricardo Gimenes promises with his new project, Vectorlooza (nice job on the clever video too!).

We don’t link to crowdfunding projects very often, but this one has certainly piqued my interest. Ricardo claims Vectorlooza will outperform all other such drawing apps currently out there. What do you think? Do you use any vector apps on your iPad?

Thanks to Jesse R. Ewring for the tip!

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The Chimerist: Looking at art on the iPad

The Chimerist takes a look at iPad apps for looking at art.

thechimerist:

Sometimes, when people ask me how useful my iPad is (meaning: compared to a laptop), I’m at a bit of a loss. How do you measure the utility of taking a ten-minute break to dip into Fotopedia’s spread on the Alhambra or to glance at the Guardian’s photo of the day? Hours of reading and writing…

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There seems to be no shortage of digital drawings tools for the iPad, but Inkr might be the first one made for actually drawing on paper.

And what a simple, brilliant idea — an iPad app that lets you take photos of your sketches, resize them, overlay custom grids, and then — presto — acts as a lightbox for refining the drawings further.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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johnmartz:

Hey look, it’s me! Starring in Backwards Day, the iPad kids’ book I illustrated for JibJab Jr. The book is now live in the app store, and I couldn’t be happier with it how it turned out. JibJab has corralled a team of great illustrators to put out a book a month, all of which can be personalized to make your child the star of the book.
Too many apps published under the guise of “kids’ books” are so full of interactive things to touch and figure out and play with that they’re more like games than books. All of that extra junk gets in the way of what books are for, which is reading. JibJab Jr. books have a single interactive element: turning the page. So I am proud to be part of a series of iPad books that are books first, and apps second.
The books are penned by the amazing rhymester Scott Emmons.
Here’s a little sneak preview of how the book looks. Forgive the wonky video. I took it on my phone and used YouTube’s motion stabilizing feature which created some weird ghosting at the beginning:

johnmartz:

Hey look, it’s me! Starring in Backwards Day, the iPad kids’ book I illustrated for JibJab Jr. The book is now live in the app store, and I couldn’t be happier with it how it turned out. JibJab has corralled a team of great illustrators to put out a book a month, all of which can be personalized to make your child the star of the book.

Too many apps published under the guise of “kids’ books” are so full of interactive things to touch and figure out and play with that they’re more like games than books. All of that extra junk gets in the way of what books are for, which is reading. JibJab Jr. books have a single interactive element: turning the page. So I am proud to be part of a series of iPad books that are books first, and apps second.

The books are penned by the amazing rhymester Scott Emmons.

Here’s a little sneak preview of how the book looks. Forgive the wonky video. I took it on my phone and used YouTube’s motion stabilizing feature which created some weird ghosting at the beginning:

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I was skeptical that an iPad app devoted to a single illustrator could be more than just a portfolio, but Above and Beyond: John Kascht is indeed more than just a portfolio of Kascht’s impressive caricatures.

If you’ve watched this 30-minute video about John’s process drawing Conan O’Brien, you’ll know the level of thought and consideration that goes into his portraits, and the level insight he imparts on his audience.  More videos on John’s site.

The highly-polished app lets you swipe through a gallery of John’s work, view each piece’s preliminary sketches, and listen to John talk about his trying to capture the spirit of his subjects.

A highlight of the app is a look at his Pennsylvania farmhouse, and his spacious barn-turned-studio.

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Drunken Franz (timelapse, ipad, brushes app) (by Andre)

I didn’t know Brushes on the iPad did time lapse. Pretty great. It’s the work of Andre Stubbe.

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Bamboo Stylus — A premium digital pen for the iPad, Bamboo Stylus delivers a high-end look, natural, weighted feel of a real pen, to give you capabilities for drawing, sketching and note taking on an iPad.

I think this is a good thing. (Though I think Wacom could have shown better artwork and used a nicer font.)

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Cartoonist Aaron Renier, author of the recent The Unsinkable Walker Bean, created this comic based on Roald Dahl’s Matilda. It’s a lovingly crafted tribute to both Quentin Blake’s illustrations and to the beauty and magic of reading printed books. Growing up having read every Roald Dahl book I could find at my local library, this is pitch perfect — click through for the full thing.

Cartoonist Aaron Renier, author of the recent The Unsinkable Walker Bean, created this comic based on Roald Dahl’s Matilda. It’s a lovingly crafted tribute to both Quentin Blake’s illustrations and to the beauty and magic of reading printed books. Growing up having read every Roald Dahl book I could find at my local library, this is pitch perfect — click through for the full thing.

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Audience Calibration Procedure (by Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery )

The latest mysterious trailer for Superbrothers’ (aka Craig Adams’s) iOS app Sword & Swocery EP. I’ve been eagerly awaiting this game. Superbrothers’ deft use of pixel art with Jim Guthrie’s music? Sign me up.

Superbrothers really understands the idea of videogames as an experience and as interactive art, as evidenced by an essay on BoingBoing I revisit frequently: Less Talk, More Rock.

I linked to it recently on my personal blog where I said:

It’s a thoughtful piece about how to communicate ideas and emotions effectively in games by eliminating the “disruptive talk” — the exposition, the hand-holding, and the noise. I think it’s a solid philosophy for all creative work.
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MORE/REAL Stylus Cap by Don Lehman — Kickstarter

A clever product — a stylus for touchscreen devices designed to fit a Sharpie pen (and other brands) as a traditional pen lid. The Kickstarter funds have been fully pledged (though you can still contribute money), so the project is a reality.

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The iPad edition of Oliver Jeffers’s The Heart and the Bottle looks intriguing. I’m skeptical of picture books being treated with gimmicky animation, but this looks great.

(Source: youtube.com)

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Subtraction.com: My iPad Magazine Stand

Former NYTimes.com designer Khoi Vinh on magazines formatted for iPads and tablets.

In a media world that looks increasingly like the busy downtown heart of a city — with innumerable activities, events and alternative sources of distraction around you — these apps demand that you confine yourself to a remote, suburban cul-de-sac.

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Introducing the New Yorker iPad App

Jason Schwartzman demonstrates the magazine’s new iPad app. It’s particularly nice to see the attention given to the cartoons, which get their own gallery in addition to being peppered throughout each issue.