Posts tagged history

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movingthestill:

“A SHORT HISTORY OF THE GIF” by Legs (<— AWESOME.)

Tonights the night! Moving The Still: A GIF Festival’s final night live in Miami will close with an amazing party with DJ sets by Dan Deacon and Wild Nothing. Join us! 

Presented by @MilkStudios @Paddle8 @Tumblr @Smartwater | #MovingTheStill #SmartBasel

Short and sweet!

(via excusedfromthis)

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Know who this is? When? Where? What? Why it matters? 
There has never been a proper textbook on the history of illustration. It&#8217;s important, not just for training students but for representing the field and its legacy to the world.
In order to help get a textbook going, I have written a SURVEY to help determine the content, scope, format, and tone of a potential textbook. Whitney Sherman, an instructor at the Maryland Institute College of Art, co-authored the SURVEY, and it was checked over by a range of qualified people. We don&#8217;t have plans to write one ourselves - we just see the need for information for whoever does. The  New York Society of Illustrators is sponsoring this SURVEY.
Now it&#8217;s YOUR turn - have your say, as a teacher, student, collector, or scholar:
SURVEY
Oh, and it&#8217;s Arthur William Brown, circa 1945, New York, unidentified model, and it&#8217;s important because Brown was one of the biggest promoters of illustration in his day and a big influence on the evolution of sexualized beauty standards, for better and worse. Original on file at Society of Illustrators.

Know who this is? When? Where? What? Why it matters?

There has never been a proper textbook on the history of illustration. It’s important, not just for training students but for representing the field and its legacy to the world.

In order to help get a textbook going, I have written a SURVEY to help determine the content, scope, format, and tone of a potential textbook. Whitney Sherman, an instructor at the Maryland Institute College of Art, co-authored the SURVEY, and it was checked over by a range of qualified people. We don’t have plans to write one ourselves - we just see the need for information for whoever does. The  New York Society of Illustrators is sponsoring this SURVEY.

Now it’s YOUR turn - have your say, as a teacher, student, collector, or scholar:

SURVEY

Oh, and it’s Arthur William Brown, circa 1945, New York, unidentified model, and it’s important because Brown was one of the biggest promoters of illustration in his day and a big influence on the evolution of sexualized beauty standards, for better and worse. Original on file at Society of Illustrators.

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Index of Canadian Illustrators - Index of Canadian Illustrators

We’ve mentioned it before, but it bears repeating that Drawn’s very own Jaleen Grove maintains The Index of Canadian Illustrators. Go check it out!

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Lief Peng is one of the most knowledgeable illustration historians out there. If you&#8217;re in Toronto next Wednesday, please do yourself a huge favour and go see him speak: 

On October 26, from 7 to 9&#160;pm, I’ll be in Toronto at The Nook giving a talk about Marvin Friedman and many other mid-century illustrators whom I’ve written about over the last six years. I’ll share stories and anecdotes—some from my research but also many from personal interviews I’ve conducted with many Canadian and American illustrators of the mid-20th century. I’ll be looking at changing styles and technology and how both have impacted the business of illustration over the last half century. Perhaps we can learn something from the lessons of the past… or perhaps we are doomed to repeat it. (via Marvin Friedman: &#8220;You had to do what you had to do to get the work.&#8221;)

(Illustration above is by the great Marvin Friedman.)

Lief Peng is one of the most knowledgeable illustration historians out there. If you’re in Toronto next Wednesday, please do yourself a huge favour and go see him speak: 

On October 26, from 7 to 9 pm, I’ll be in Toronto at The Nook giving a talk about Marvin Friedman and many other mid-century illustrators whom I’ve written about over the last six years. I’ll share stories and anecdotes—some from my research but also many from personal interviews I’ve conducted with many Canadian and American illustrators of the mid-20th century. I’ll be looking at changing styles and technology and how both have impacted the business of illustration over the last half century. Perhaps we can learn something from the lessons of the past… or perhaps we are doomed to repeat it. (via Marvin Friedman: “You had to do what you had to do to get the work.”)

(Illustration above is by the great Marvin Friedman.)

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In the summer of 1950, Hans Namuth approached Jackson Pollock and asked the abstract expressionist painter if he could photograph him in his studio, working with his “drip” technique of painting. When Namuth arrived, he found:

A dripping wet canvas covered the entire floor. Blinding shafts of sunlight hit the wet canvas, making its surface hard to see. There was complete silence…. Pollock looked at the painting. Then unexpectedly, he picked up can and paintbrush and started to move around the canvas. It was as if he suddenly realized the painting was not finished. His movements, slow at first, gradually became faster and more dancelike as he flung black, white and rust-colored paint onto the canvas.

The images from this shoot “helped transform Pollock from a talented, cranky loner into the first media-driven superstar of American contemporary art, the jeans-clad, chain-smoking poster boy of abstract expressionism,” one critic later wrote in The Washington Post. But Namuth wasn’t satisfied that he had really captured the essence of Pollock’s work. He wanted to capture Pollock in motion and color, to focus on the painter and painting alike.

Above, you can watch the result of Namuth’s second effort. The ten-minute film, simply called Jackson Pollock 51 (the 51 being short for 1951), lets you see Pollock painting from a unique angle — through glass. The film achieved Namuth’s aesthetic goals, but it came at a price. Apparently the filming taxed Pollock emotionally, and by the evening, the painter decided to pour himself some bourbon, his first drink in two years. A blowout argument followed; Pollock never stopped drinking again; and it was downhill from there…

(via Jackson Pollock: Lights, Camera, Paint! (1951) | Open Culture)

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illustratedvancouver:

Old Hotel Vancouver, a sketch by Charles Hepburn Scott circa 1929, featuring the Art Gallery steps and the second Hotel Vancouver (now the site of the Sears building). From the VAG’s 1989 Charles Hepburn Scott publication.

It was a happy surprise to stumble onto Jason Vanderhill&#8217;s Illustrated Vancouver blog. It&#8217;s pretty straightforward: he shares old illustrations, photos, and paintings about Vancouver. 

illustratedvancouver:

Old Hotel Vancouver, a sketch by Charles Hepburn Scott circa 1929, featuring the Art Gallery steps and the second Hotel Vancouver (now the site of the Sears building). From the VAG’s 1989 Charles Hepburn Scott publication.

It was a happy surprise to stumble onto Jason Vanderhill’s Illustrated Vancouver blog. It’s pretty straightforward: he shares old illustrations, photos, and paintings about Vancouver.