Posts tagged design

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(via Handlettered logos from defunct department stores)
A beautiful collection of hand-rendered script lettering from old department stores.

(via Handlettered logos from defunct department stores)

A beautiful collection of hand-rendered script lettering from old department stores.

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I’m not sure whether to call Jesse LeDoux a designerly illustrator, or an illustrative designer, but I do know that he’s completely awesome. Seattle-ites take notice: Jesse’s LeDouxville Space pop-up store/show/gallery is happening near you! Next month!

(via Jesse LeDoux to present LeDouxville Space in Seattle, WA)

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theoinglis:

Im always on the look out for second hand books, so yesterday when I walked past a church with a sign outside saying ‘book fare’ I couldn’t resist!

Got this rather nice book; True to Type by Denys Parsons for £2. It was published in 1955. The yellow of the cover and its illustration caught my eye, the drawings in the book are by Haro. Can’t find anything online about Haro, which is a shame as the illustrations in this are really lovely and simple. Plus there are lots of them, way more than other old illustrated books I’ve almost bought before.

I love the mid-century modern furniture in the 3rd picture, and the policeman in the 4th. But they are all great!

In a strange coincidence I saw the exact same book minus the dust jacket for sale at the flea market today for the same price!

The rest of the illustrations and some more photos are on my flickr here

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Fabulous work by someone called “YemaYema” on Dribbble. More on her/his site, including some sweet t-shirt designs. 
(via Dribbble - Sailor by YemaYema & @gcoghill)

Fabulous work by someone called “YemaYema” on Dribbble. More on her/his site, including some sweet t-shirt designs. 

(via Dribbble - Sailor by YemaYema & @gcoghill)

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Absolutely everything Brent Couchman draws. I love. His minimalist website is equally gorgeous.

Absolutely everything Brent Couchman draws. I love. His minimalist website is equally gorgeous.

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luclatulippe:

Any map, printed onto a blanket! I am mentally refurnishing our home today. I gotta get off these damn design blogs!

Soft Cities is a San Francisco-based company that sells blankets and napkins that feature a map of your favorite location. It could be your house, a vacation spot, a workplace, your school, etc. You pick the location, we make the map, then you have a picnic on your neighborhood! (via About Soft Cities | soft cities)

luclatulippe:

Any map, printed onto a blanket! I am mentally refurnishing our home today. I gotta get off these damn design blogs!

Soft Cities is a San Francisco-based company that sells blankets and napkins that feature a map of your favorite location. It could be your house, a vacation spot, a workplace, your school, etc. You pick the location, we make the map, then you have a picnic on your neighborhood! (via About Soft Cities | soft cities)

(via luclatulippe-deactivated2013102)

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Dribble Friday — Monkey Butt by Chris Parks
EDIT (2 hours later): Oh jeez I can’t believe I misspelled Dribbble. <- HA! This sentence is also funny.

Dribble Friday — Monkey Butt by Chris Parks

EDIT (2 hours later): Oh jeez I can’t believe I misspelled Dribbble. <- HA! This sentence is also funny.

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This just in from Jez Burrows and friends:

A limited set of prints by five designers, illustrators, and artists, inspired by—and for the benefit of—WNYC&#8217;s Radiolab. Limited to an edition of just 100, In Radiolab We Trust is a set of five B5 two-colour Gocco prints, packaged in specially produced spot-colour wrapping paper. All proceeds after printing costs will go to Radiolab. (via In Radiolab We Trust)

Get &#8216;em while they&#8217;re hot! I really dig this one by Richard Perez! 

This just in from Jez Burrows and friends:

A limited set of prints by five designers, illustrators, and artists, inspired by—and for the benefit of—WNYC’s Radiolab. Limited to an edition of just 100, In Radiolab We Trust is a set of five B5 two-colour Gocco prints, packaged in specially produced spot-colour wrapping paper. All proceeds after printing costs will go to Radiolab. (via In Radiolab We Trust)

Get ‘em while they’re hot! I really dig this one by Richard Perez

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Cool little known reference books on vintage postcards

Since we Canadians are coming up to an election I thought I’d share something patriotic. Unless you are a postcard collector you probably won’t come across these books. They’re produced by Michael J. Smith, who has been collecting vintage Canadian postcards for a loooong time. Although written for collectors and focusing mainly on cataloguing, the book I just bought has 900 colour reproductions of cards from 1903-1920 or so. (Image here is from vintagepostcards.org)

You can also read an essay here by Michael on vintage postcard collecting.

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Wow. My friends and international rock stars of the rock poster scene (not to mention the all the packaging design, identity design, and graphic design in general) have achieved a major milestone. Aesthetic Apparatus has published 500 posters in their twelve years of existence. An amazing accomplishment worthy of hoisting a few celebratory beverages from afar: Here’s to 500 more, Michael and Dan!

(via AESTHETIC APPARATUS: 500 POSTERS)

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John Pavlus at Fast Company Co.Design articulates the conflicting thoughts running through my own head about this. People have understandably been quick to attack John for this, but I believe it&#8217;s still an important conversation to have (although I agree he chose a terrible title). 

Let&#8217;s say I did buy one of these posters: what on earth am I supposed to do with it? Hang it in my living room like some overly aestheticized/sanitized symbol of a blindly horrific natural disaster that I had no direct experience of? Or, worse, as some sick, bragging monument to my own willingness to &#8220;help&#8221;?
(…)
It&#8217;s not impugning Signalnoise&#8217;s motives to ask these questions, but it does make me wonder if the designer fully thought through everything that the project implied before starting it. If not, we can hardly fault him—the first response to any tragedy is always emotional, for better or worse, and the urge to just dosomethinganythingNOW is a powerful one.
(…)
But then, shouldn&#8217;t our desire to donate come from actual compassion, not as a side effect of our fascination with pretty artifacts? Indeed it should. Of course, there are a lot of things we should do out of basic human decency that often go undone. So maybe projects like these are just coldly efficient, making lemonade from lemons. Yes, the actual product is unavoidably, fundamentally grotesque if you look beneath its tasteful surface.
(via Is This Poster to Aid Japan&#8217;s Tsunami Victims a Crime Against Design?)

John Pavlus at Fast Company Co.Design articulates the conflicting thoughts running through my own head about this. People have understandably been quick to attack John for this, but I believe it’s still an important conversation to have (although I agree he chose a terrible title). 

Let’s say I did buy one of these posters: what on earth am I supposed to do with it? Hang it in my living room like some overly aestheticized/sanitized symbol of a blindly horrific natural disaster that I had no direct experience of? Or, worse, as some sick, bragging monument to my own willingness to “help”?

(…)

It’s not impugning Signalnoise’s motives to ask these questions, but it does make me wonder if the designer fully thought through everything that the project implied before starting it. If not, we can hardly fault him—the first response to any tragedy is always emotional, for better or worse, and the urge to just dosomethinganythingNOW is a powerful one.

(…)

But then, shouldn’t our desire to donate come from actual compassion, not as a side effect of our fascination with pretty artifacts? Indeed it should. Of course, there are a lot of things we should do out of basic human decency that often go undone. So maybe projects like these are just coldly efficient, making lemonade from lemons. Yes, the actual product is unavoidably, fundamentally grotesque if you look beneath its tasteful surface.

(via Is This Poster to Aid Japan’s Tsunami Victims a Crime Against Design?)

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Milton Glaser&#8217;s 1976 concept sketch for I (heart) NY.

Milton Glaser’s 1976 concept sketch for I (heart) NY.

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"Whale of a Convention" (by K. James+ Add Contact)
The clean graphics, type choices, and faded, distressed ink on this 1955 periodical are a beautiful combination.

"Whale of a Convention" (by K. James+ Add Contact)

The clean graphics, type choices, and faded, distressed ink on this 1955 periodical are a beautiful combination.

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Seth&#8217;s book design process (National Post)

Seth’s book design process (National Post)