Posts tagged composition

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rebeccamock:

Been working on personal projects lately! Here’s a digital painting I did today. :>
A self-portrait in windows and corners. Thinking about Tacita Dean’s piece called “More or Less”, which I saw last night at the New Museum.

Rebecca Mock!!! Three exclamation marks!
My eye wants to take in every wonderful thing in this quiet frozen moment in time: the textures, the soft changes in colour and tone, the map on the wall, that little photo, the bedspread, everything. I want to walk on that smooth polished floor, explore the rest of this little apartment, crane my neck into the next room so I can peek out that window. This is entirely due to Rebecca’s command of light and colour and composition.
A lot of artists think style is the most important thing to good art, but it isn’t. Style is a by-product, and tends to change multiple times over the course of your career. Style can be faked, copied, especially with the tech at our disposal today. 
But you can’t fake light and colour and composition. You either understand them or you don’t. They’re deliberate and planned, yet used poorly can result in pieces that are uptight and lifeless and cold. It can take years for most of us to get a decent grasp of them, even a lifetime. But they eventually become like tools in your kit, like your brushes and pens and paint. And when you know how to master them, you can create little worlds that seem so alive your audience will wish they could walk into them. 

rebeccamock:

Been working on personal projects lately! Here’s a digital painting I did today. :>

A self-portrait in windows and corners. Thinking about Tacita Dean’s piece called “More or Less”, which I saw last night at the New Museum.

Rebecca Mock!!! Three exclamation marks!

My eye wants to take in every wonderful thing in this quiet frozen moment in time: the textures, the soft changes in colour and tone, the map on the wall, that little photo, the bedspread, everything. I want to walk on that smooth polished floor, explore the rest of this little apartment, crane my neck into the next room so I can peek out that window. This is entirely due to Rebecca’s command of light and colour and composition.

A lot of artists think style is the most important thing to good art, but it isn’t. Style is a by-product, and tends to change multiple times over the course of your career. Style can be faked, copied, especially with the tech at our disposal today. 

But you can’t fake light and colour and composition. You either understand them or you don’t. They’re deliberate and planned, yet used poorly can result in pieces that are uptight and lifeless and cold. It can take years for most of us to get a decent grasp of them, even a lifetime. But they eventually become like tools in your kit, like your brushes and pens and paint. And when you know how to master them, you can create little worlds that seem so alive your audience will wish they could walk into them. 

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Comics Correspondence Course with Frank Santoro

Cartoonist and Comics Journal columnist Frank Santoro is about to start the second of his correspondence courses, with a deadline for applications of May 30th. Complete details here. You might know Frank from his books Cold Heat and Storeyville, or more recent turns in Sammy Harkham’s anthology series Kramer’s Ergot. Frank’s approach to comics-making is one of the more unique ones I’ve seen, rooted in old school printing techniques and renaissance-era “golden ratio” -type harmonic compositions, and increasingly based less on black lines and more on building colors in layers.

It’s fascinating stuff, even though I only understand about a third of it, and am only half convinced of even that (another ratio!). But if I had the time and cheddar, I’d take his course in a hot minute. I’m probably not the only one out there who could stand to look at his own approach to drawing and mark-making and composition from a whole new angle (I’m looking at you, Everyone). For more on Frank, I recommend his series of Layout Workbook posts on tcj.com, which go through a lot of his ideas about grids and the harmonic points in compositions. 

Also hello! This is my first post as a Drawn! contributor; first-time caller, long-time listener. If you don’t like it, I suggest you blame… Frank Santoro. 

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Akira Kurosawa | Group Compositions in Seven Samurai