Posts tagged color

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maikeplenzke:
Happy new year everybody! I hope you all had wonderful holidays!
Here is the second card for Rotopolpress. It’s not really snowing here anymore (it’s actually quite warm) but I drew this in December when there was snow everywhere. 


I love Maike Plenzke’s work. Beautiful. More here and here. 

maikeplenzke:

Happy new year everybody! I hope you all had wonderful holidays!

Here is the second card for Rotopolpress. It’s not really snowing here anymore (it’s actually quite warm) but I drew this in December when there was snow everywhere. 

I love Maike Plenzke’s work. Beautiful. More here and here

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nevver:

Pantone

I just spend the whole morning struggling with how best to color skin tones in a project, so this post caught me… well, too late, I already finished. But I’m saving it in my “desert island” bookmarks folder. Many more colors/skins at the link itself

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rebeccamock:

Been working on personal projects lately! Here’s a digital painting I did today. :>
A self-portrait in windows and corners. Thinking about Tacita Dean’s piece called “More or Less”, which I saw last night at the New Museum.

Rebecca Mock!!! Three exclamation marks!
My eye wants to take in every wonderful thing in this quiet frozen moment in time: the textures, the soft changes in colour and tone, the map on the wall, that little photo, the bedspread, everything. I want to walk on that smooth polished floor, explore the rest of this little apartment, crane my neck into the next room so I can peek out that window. This is entirely due to Rebecca’s command of light and colour and composition.
A lot of artists think style is the most important thing to good art, but it isn’t. Style is a by-product, and tends to change multiple times over the course of your career. Style can be faked, copied, especially with the tech at our disposal today. 
But you can’t fake light and colour and composition. You either understand them or you don’t. They’re deliberate and planned, yet used poorly can result in pieces that are uptight and lifeless and cold. It can take years for most of us to get a decent grasp of them, even a lifetime. But they eventually become like tools in your kit, like your brushes and pens and paint. And when you know how to master them, you can create little worlds that seem so alive your audience will wish they could walk into them. 

rebeccamock:

Been working on personal projects lately! Here’s a digital painting I did today. :>

A self-portrait in windows and corners. Thinking about Tacita Dean’s piece called “More or Less”, which I saw last night at the New Museum.

Rebecca Mock!!! Three exclamation marks!

My eye wants to take in every wonderful thing in this quiet frozen moment in time: the textures, the soft changes in colour and tone, the map on the wall, that little photo, the bedspread, everything. I want to walk on that smooth polished floor, explore the rest of this little apartment, crane my neck into the next room so I can peek out that window. This is entirely due to Rebecca’s command of light and colour and composition.

A lot of artists think style is the most important thing to good art, but it isn’t. Style is a by-product, and tends to change multiple times over the course of your career. Style can be faked, copied, especially with the tech at our disposal today. 

But you can’t fake light and colour and composition. You either understand them or you don’t. They’re deliberate and planned, yet used poorly can result in pieces that are uptight and lifeless and cold. It can take years for most of us to get a decent grasp of them, even a lifetime. But they eventually become like tools in your kit, like your brushes and pens and paint. And when you know how to master them, you can create little worlds that seem so alive your audience will wish they could walk into them. 

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The Color of Change: Can Colorful Images Help Solve Social Problems?