Posts tagged charity

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Old & New Project

Cassie McDaniel

The Old & New Project is a collaborative design project realized by Jim LePage and Troy Deshano that “exhibits works themed on Biblical stories and passages….attempting to replace popular, yet sometimes low-quality, contemporary Biblical artwork with the kind of accessible and honorable work that has historically been associated with the Bible.” On the site, Jim and Troy say they are not attempting to convert anyone or create religious propaganda. They say that they “want, in fact we need, artists from all types of faith perspectives….including those who have had a really negative experience with the church, agnostics and atheists.” 

As each design is posted, prints are made available through the Old & New’s Society6 shop and all proceeds will go to a particular charity. For the current round, the charity is Blood Water Mission, an organization that focuses on empowering communities to work together against the HIV/AIDS and water crises in Africa.

I’m very proud to be a part of this project, as I’m currently working on my design. I find the project a fascinating endeavor and I’m curious to see where it’ll go from here. So far, great designs by Cassie McDaniel (that’s hers posted above), Andrew Lyons, Nate Utesch, Lydia Nichols, Lisa Romero, among others have been posted. Check them out here.

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John Pavlus at Fast Company Co.Design articulates the conflicting thoughts running through my own head about this. People have understandably been quick to attack John for this, but I believe it’s still an important conversation to have (although I agree he chose a terrible title). 

Let’s say I did buy one of these posters: what on earth am I supposed to do with it? Hang it in my living room like some overly aestheticized/sanitized symbol of a blindly horrific natural disaster that I had no direct experience of? Or, worse, as some sick, bragging monument to my own willingness to “help”?
(…)
It’s not impugning Signalnoise’s motives to ask these questions, but it does make me wonder if the designer fully thought through everything that the project implied before starting it. If not, we can hardly fault him—the first response to any tragedy is always emotional, for better or worse, and the urge to just dosomethinganythingNOW is a powerful one.
(…)
But then, shouldn’t our desire to donate come from actual compassion, not as a side effect of our fascination with pretty artifacts? Indeed it should. Of course, there are a lot of things we should do out of basic human decency that often go undone. So maybe projects like these are just coldly efficient, making lemonade from lemons. Yes, the actual product is unavoidably, fundamentally grotesque if you look beneath its tasteful surface.
(via Is This Poster to Aid Japan’s Tsunami Victims a Crime Against Design?)

John Pavlus at Fast Company Co.Design articulates the conflicting thoughts running through my own head about this. People have understandably been quick to attack John for this, but I believe it’s still an important conversation to have (although I agree he chose a terrible title). 

Let’s say I did buy one of these posters: what on earth am I supposed to do with it? Hang it in my living room like some overly aestheticized/sanitized symbol of a blindly horrific natural disaster that I had no direct experience of? Or, worse, as some sick, bragging monument to my own willingness to “help”?

(…)

It’s not impugning Signalnoise’s motives to ask these questions, but it does make me wonder if the designer fully thought through everything that the project implied before starting it. If not, we can hardly fault him—the first response to any tragedy is always emotional, for better or worse, and the urge to just dosomethinganythingNOW is a powerful one.

(…)

But then, shouldn’t our desire to donate come from actual compassion, not as a side effect of our fascination with pretty artifacts? Indeed it should. Of course, there are a lot of things we should do out of basic human decency that often go undone. So maybe projects like these are just coldly efficient, making lemonade from lemons. Yes, the actual product is unavoidably, fundamentally grotesque if you look beneath its tasteful surface.

(via Is This Poster to Aid Japan’s Tsunami Victims a Crime Against Design?)

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Joe Alterio of the awesome project Robots & Monsters has seen fit to call me an “All-Star!” I’ll take it! And what does that mean to you, you robot- and/or monster-lover? It means that you can bid on a chance to give me some suggestions, and I’ll draw you a big (9”x12”-ish) robot or monster to love and cherish for years to come. (or from which to cower in fear, if you want a scary one) Go place your bids for a chance to have me do your bidding! As always, funds raised go toward a charitable organization!

Joe Alterio of the awesome project Robots & Monsters has seen fit to call me an “All-Star!” I’ll take it! And what does that mean to you, you robot- and/or monster-lover? It means that you can bid on a chance to give me some suggestions, and I’ll draw you a big (9”x12”-ish) robot or monster to love and cherish for years to come. (or from which to cower in fear, if you want a scary one) Go place your bids for a chance to have me do your bidding! As always, funds raised go toward a charitable organization!