Posts tagged cartooning

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johnmartz:

For the third consecutive year I designed the poster for the National Cartoonist Society Foundation’s Jay Kennedy Scholarship for Cartooning.
The deadline is fast approaching — applications must be postmarked by December 15th, 2012. Any North American student who will be in their junior or senior year of college or university during the 2013-2014 academic year is eligible. You do not have to be an art major. More information at www.cartoonistfoundation.org

This is a great opportunity for any student who draws comics, does animation, or dabbles in any sort of cartooning. Only a few days left to get your application in the mail!

johnmartz:

For the third consecutive year I designed the poster for the National Cartoonist Society Foundation’s Jay Kennedy Scholarship for Cartooning.

The deadline is fast approaching — applications must be postmarked by December 15th, 2012. Any North American student who will be in their junior or senior year of college or university during the 2013-2014 academic year is eligible. You do not have to be an art major. More information at www.cartoonistfoundation.org

This is a great opportunity for any student who draws comics, does animation, or dabbles in any sort of cartooning. Only a few days left to get your application in the mail!

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radiomaru:

A nice person teaching at CalArts did an anatomy lesson and included examples from me and Meredith Gran and others.

See, I … I know what i’m… i’m … doing….

http://stulivingston.blogspot.com/2012/10/life-drawing-for-animation-demoz.html

We are in a golden age of comics and cartoonists being embraced by smart people in academia. To those learning comics now as young people, enjoy this privilege that no other generation before yours has enjoyed! 

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Oh jeez, just look at this poster by Joe Lambert for Cartoon College, the documentary about the Center for Cartoon Studies in Vermont.

Oh jeez, just look at this poster by Joe Lambert for Cartoon College, the documentary about the Center for Cartoon Studies in Vermont.

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Can you spot the two dots in this Mick Stevens cartoon that threaten the New Yorker from being banned from Facebook?
(via Nipplegate: Why the New Yorker Cartoon Department Is About to Be Banned from Facebook : The New Yorker)

Can you spot the two dots in this Mick Stevens cartoon that threaten the New Yorker from being banned from Facebook?

(via Nipplegate: Why the New Yorker Cartoon Department Is About to Be Banned from Facebook : The New Yorker)

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Yesterday on CBC’s “Q” Jian Ghomeshi interviewed both Terry Mosher and Matt Bors regarding the state of editorial cartooning. Trying to embed the CBC’s audio player is like trying to nail Jell-O to a tree, so rather than embedding only that segment, I was only able to add the entire 75-minute show. Just forward to the 4:00 mark and you can listen the 20-minute segment on cartooning. 

EDIT: removed the embed because it wouldn’t not autoplay. Here’s the link.

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Cartoonist Chris Schweizer wrote a handy guide to spotting tangents in your artwork — those pesky spots where elements in a drawing line up in ways that can confuse or mislead a reader.

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Ex-Weta Workshop designer Tim Gibson offers up this useful video tutorial on character design tips, as part of the process for his upcoming Moth City graphic novel.

(Source: youtube.com)

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Item 1: Steve Wolfhard is on Tumblr! Item 2: he’s been designing these crazy steins, like this one based on Settlers of Catan.

Item 1: Steve Wolfhard is on Tumblr! Item 2: he’s been designing these crazy steins, like this one based on Settlers of Catan.

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Here’s Chris Ware being interviewed on a short arts program called Fear No Art. There are a few moments of awkwardness between the chipper host and the slightly less chipper cartoonist, but we get some great shots of Chris Ware’s studio and get to watch him ink a drawing.

(Source: youtube.com)

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Marmaduke, like a lot of classic comic strips, gets a bad rap these days as an all-too-easy punchline (and sure, the recent movie didn’t help) for unfunny comics, which always strikes me as a bit unfair. Because isn’t it great that today’s world of comics has enough material to cater to such a variety of tastes? Marmaduke-lovers included. 

Regardless, I  don’t think I had ever seen the strip’s earlier incarnations. Its bold clean lines barely resemble the loose scribbly Great Dane we know today.

cartoonretro:

Very appealing simplicity in Brad Anderson’s early Marmaduke strips.

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Here’s a nice find — four Franco-Belgian cartoonists on a television program called Tac Au Tac in 1971 collaborating/jamming on a drawing together — Franquin (Spirou), Morris (Lucky Luke), Peyo (The Smurfs), and Jean Roba (Boule et Bill).

(Source: youtube.com)

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Students! You have just under a month to get your applications in for the Jay Kennedy cartooning scholarship. This is a great opportunity to not only help pay for your education, but to meet and be celebrated by the NCS at their annual Reuben Awards party weekend.
johnmartz:

For the second year in a row, I had the honour of creating the poster for the Jay Kennedy Memorial Scholarship.
Awarded by the National Cartoonists Society Foundation, the scholarship gives $5000 to a promising student cartoonist every year. The scholarship is open to any student in the US, Canada and Mexico, and you do not need to be an art student.
More information is available at the NCSF website, and I encourage all students with cartooning in their blood to apply.
You can see the poster I did for last year’s scholarship.
EDIT: Here’s a high-res printable PDF of this year’s poster if you want to print it out for your school or comic shop.

Students! You have just under a month to get your applications in for the Jay Kennedy cartooning scholarship. This is a great opportunity to not only help pay for your education, but to meet and be celebrated by the NCS at their annual Reuben Awards party weekend.

johnmartz:

For the second year in a row, I had the honour of creating the poster for the Jay Kennedy Memorial Scholarship.

Awarded by the National Cartoonists Society Foundation, the scholarship gives $5000 to a promising student cartoonist every year. The scholarship is open to any student in the US, Canada and Mexico, and you do not need to be an art student.

More information is available at the NCSF website, and I encourage all students with cartooning in their blood to apply.

You can see the poster I did for last year’s scholarship.

EDIT: Here’s a high-res printable PDF of this year’s poster if you want to print it out for your school or comic shop.

(via johnmartz)

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When I was a kid I was a big library nerd, and I exhausted my local library’s collection of books about cartooning and comics. I grew up with a romantic idea of cartooning history, fuelled by musty old books and black and white photos. The world of the cartoonist was magical and mysterious, and there was nothing I wanted more than to be a part of it.
Fast forward a few years, and I’ve managed to turn my childhood daydreams of cartooning into a career. But the realities of adulthood have a tendency to strip away the magic of childhood sometimes.
The Internet makes it all too easy to track down information on obscure cartoonists. Publishers like Drawn & Quarterly and Fantagraphics continue to churn out collections reprinting old comic books and strips. The treasure hunt is mostly gone. I’ve even joined organizations like the National Cartoonists Society, which I am honoured to be a part of, but which has also had the unexpected side effect of destroying the mystique that the NCS once held when I was a kid. I suppose it’s that old Groucho line about never wanting to be in a club that would have you as a member.
So I unabashedly love Seth’s new book, The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists. It’s a prequel of sorts to Wimbledon Green, and sets the scene and describes the world in which Seth’s made-up history of Canadian cartooning and comics takes place.
It’s odd to feel nostalgic for something that doesn’t exist, but reading The G.N.B. Double C was like taking a trip back in time, and reliving those childhood moments of discovering a secret world of cartooning with a rich, mysterious history.
We get a tour of the GNBCC’s social headquarters, learn about the club’s distinguished members, and discover their creations in the building’s magnificent (and woefully fictional) gallery and library.
The book does feature some real-life Canadian cartooning icons like Doug Wright and Jim Simpkins, but for the most part is complete fantasy — giving me, as a reader and cartoonist, the chance to once again blissfully daydream about a history and a world of cartooning I might one day be a part of.

When I was a kid I was a big library nerd, and I exhausted my local library’s collection of books about cartooning and comics. I grew up with a romantic idea of cartooning history, fuelled by musty old books and black and white photos. The world of the cartoonist was magical and mysterious, and there was nothing I wanted more than to be a part of it.

Fast forward a few years, and I’ve managed to turn my childhood daydreams of cartooning into a career. But the realities of adulthood have a tendency to strip away the magic of childhood sometimes.

The Internet makes it all too easy to track down information on obscure cartoonists. Publishers like Drawn & Quarterly and Fantagraphics continue to churn out collections reprinting old comic books and strips. The treasure hunt is mostly gone. I’ve even joined organizations like the National Cartoonists Society, which I am honoured to be a part of, but which has also had the unexpected side effect of destroying the mystique that the NCS once held when I was a kid. I suppose it’s that old Groucho line about never wanting to be in a club that would have you as a member.

So I unabashedly love Seth’s new book, The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists. It’s a prequel of sorts to Wimbledon Green, and sets the scene and describes the world in which Seth’s made-up history of Canadian cartooning and comics takes place.

It’s odd to feel nostalgic for something that doesn’t exist, but reading The G.N.B. Double C was like taking a trip back in time, and reliving those childhood moments of discovering a secret world of cartooning with a rich, mysterious history.

We get a tour of the GNBCC’s social headquarters, learn about the club’s distinguished members, and discover their creations in the building’s magnificent (and woefully fictional) gallery and library.

The book does feature some real-life Canadian cartooning icons like Doug Wright and Jim Simpkins, but for the most part is complete fantasy — giving me, as a reader and cartoonist, the chance to once again blissfully daydream about a history and a world of cartooning I might one day be a part of.

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I loved these expressive cartoon faces by Yann Le Bec even before I realized it was a hidden alphabet.
(via Yann Le Bec, illustrator)

I loved these expressive cartoon faces by Yann Le Bec even before I realized it was a hidden alphabet.

(via Yann Le Bec, illustrator)

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austinkleon:

Roz Chast on William Steig
Steig’s drawings seem to flow effortlessly from his mind to his pen and onto the paper. I doubt he ever looked at a blank sheet and thought, “I have nothing worthwhile to say today,” or “I can’t draw a car as well as Joe Shmoe, so why don’t I crawl back into bed and wait for the day to be over.” Steig gave himself permission to be playful and experimental. One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. To quote Pablo Picasso, Steig’s favorite artist, “All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”
Steig is one of my favorites—Chast’s essay is from a new book on his work, Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

austinkleon:

Roz Chast on William Steig

Steig’s drawings seem to flow effortlessly from his mind to his pen and onto the paper. I doubt he ever looked at a blank sheet and thought, “I have nothing worthwhile to say today,” or “I can’t draw a car as well as Joe Shmoe, so why don’t I crawl back into bed and wait for the day to be over.” Steig gave himself permission to be playful and experimental. One of the many wonderful things about looking at his drawings is their message, especially to his fellow artists: Draw what you love and what interests you. Draw it how you want to draw it. When we are children we do this instinctively. But somewhere in our passage from childhood to adulthood, the ability to be truly and fearlessly creative is often lost. To quote Pablo Picasso, Steig’s favorite artist, “All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”

Steig is one of my favorites—Chast’s essay is from a new book on his work, Cats, Dogs, Men, Women, Ninnies & Clowns: The Lost Art of William Steig

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