Posts tagged art

Want more like this? Try searching the Archives for art.


Permalink

Bruce White paints black velvet paintings for your inner nerd.

Permalink

comicsalliance:

David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” Recreated As Children’s Book

ComicsAlliance readers should by now be familiar with the work of Andrew Kolb. We’ve spotlighted the illustrator’s work a couple of times before, first for his groovy representations of The Walking Dead and other beloved artifacts of pop culture, and most recently for his work with some of comics, film and television’s most famous double-acts like The Muppets’ Bunson and Beaker and Kevin Smith’s Jay and Silent Bob, but in the style of carved wooden blocks.

Kolb’s latest work is more ambitious, telling the story of David Bowie’s classic “Space Oddity” in the style of an illustrated children’s book. The tale of doomed Major Tom plays out in Kolb’s bright and retro animation style, giving a face to the legendary Bowie character and making the conclusion that much sadder. 

Released in 1969 and considered a classic today, David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” is obviously a reference to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Like the film, Bowie’s song tells the story of an isolated astronaut whose life is threatened by a malfunction. Unfortunately for Bowie’s Major Tom, the character’s ultimate fate is decidedly grimmer than that of Kubrick’s Dave Bowman (Unless you want to get into Bowie’s “Ashes to Ashes” or the Pet Shop Boys remix of “Hallo Spaceboy” or the Peter Schilling fanfiction of “Coming Home”) 

If Bowie’s telling of the story sounds a bit dire from the start, Kolb’s reinterpretation is decidedly optimistic. Kolb’s illustrations also take their cues from that 1960s vision of the future seen in Kubrick’s films, but with the artist’s distinctly cheerful vibe that humanizes every aspect of the story, not the least of which are Major Tom’s space capsule and Ground Control themselves. Everything looks shiny and new, everybody is smiling and happy, and there’s no reason to think anything is going to go wrong. But of course it does, and in a way that fans of Bowie’s song will find quite clever. Without giving too much away, Kolb looked to the curious lyric, “And the stars look very different today” as a way to depict what exactly went wrong far above the moon.

Read the entire book at ComicsAlliance.

EDIT: We should point out that Andrew Kolb also has a Tumblr blog you can follow and drool over: http://news.kolbisneat.com/post/9454284501/full-space-oddity-book-downloading-goodness-hi

(via chrisarrant)

Permalink

In the summer of 1950, Hans Namuth approached Jackson Pollock and asked the abstract expressionist painter if he could photograph him in his studio, working with his “drip” technique of painting. When Namuth arrived, he found:

A dripping wet canvas covered the entire floor. Blinding shafts of sunlight hit the wet canvas, making its surface hard to see. There was complete silence…. Pollock looked at the painting. Then unexpectedly, he picked up can and paintbrush and started to move around the canvas. It was as if he suddenly realized the painting was not finished. His movements, slow at first, gradually became faster and more dancelike as he flung black, white and rust-colored paint onto the canvas.

The images from this shoot “helped transform Pollock from a talented, cranky loner into the first media-driven superstar of American contemporary art, the jeans-clad, chain-smoking poster boy of abstract expressionism,” one critic later wrote in The Washington Post. But Namuth wasn’t satisfied that he had really captured the essence of Pollock’s work. He wanted to capture Pollock in motion and color, to focus on the painter and painting alike.

Above, you can watch the result of Namuth’s second effort. The ten-minute film, simply called Jackson Pollock 51 (the 51 being short for 1951), lets you see Pollock painting from a unique angle — through glass. The film achieved Namuth’s aesthetic goals, but it came at a price. Apparently the filming taxed Pollock emotionally, and by the evening, the painter decided to pour himself some bourbon, his first drink in two years. A blowout argument followed; Pollock never stopped drinking again; and it was downhill from there…

(via Jackson Pollock: Lights, Camera, Paint! (1951) | Open Culture)

Permalink

Artist Spencer Goldade experiments with new media and forms with a Tumblr/project called 365 Abstracts.

Artist Spencer Goldade experiments with new media and forms with a Tumblr/project called 365 Abstracts.

Permalink

Metropolis II by Chris Burden (the movie) (by gosupermarche)

Chris Burden’s kinetic sculpture evokes the spirit of a busy city with countless toy cars zooming throughout.

Permalink

by Frederik Rattzen

Permalink
It’s a phenomenon that’s rarely discussed in the art world: The new work on a gallery wall wasn’t necessarily painted by the artist who signed it. Some well-known artists, such as Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons, openly employ small armies of assistants to do their paintings and sculptures. Others hire help more quietly.
I don’t see the big deal in this. Um, Andy Warhol, anyone? He all but opened the floodgates for this process, not to mention that many of the Great Masters used assistants to “help” them with paintings. What do you think? 

(Source: The Wall Street Journal)

Permalink

le droit de suite (the resale right) - VA (by Pierre-Emmanuel Lyet)

A short and sweet animation about artists’ resale rights in Europe, with a very clever use of typography.

Permalink

luclatulippe:

My pal Chris posts artist Robert Genn’s 10 Commandments for Artists. 
(via Art Marketing Blog: Resource: Robert Genn)

People Who Draw For A Living: take note.

luclatulippe:

My pal Chris posts artist Robert Genn’s 10 Commandments for Artists. 

(via Art Marketing Blog: Resource: Robert Genn)

People Who Draw For A Living: take note.

(via luclatulippe-deactivated2013102)

Permalink

drawnblog:

brianwood:

I am offering a free download of the entire 132-page Public Domain 2 artbook.  It’s about 115 megs, nicely high res, and looks great imported onto my iphone and ipad.  It represents about a decade of sketches and random art.
If you like it, please pick up a copy of the signed and numbered ltd ed print book!  Khepri’s selling the remaining stock, both editions, and its the only place you can pick it up.  There will be no further editions of the book beyond this.  Also be sure to check out the mini-screenprints.
Enjoy!
Click to download (direct link to pdf, right-click to save)

WOW! This is pretty fabulous! Thanks Brian. :)

For anyone who tried downloading this the other day, we noticed the URL resulted in an error page in some browsers because some characters in the link were capitalized when they should have been lowercase. Try this instead: http://www.brianwood.com/pd2.pdf

drawnblog:

brianwood:

I am offering a free download of the entire 132-page Public Domain 2 artbook.  It’s about 115 megs, nicely high res, and looks great imported onto my iphone and ipad.  It represents about a decade of sketches and random art.

If you like it, please pick up a copy of the signed and numbered ltd ed print book!  Khepri’s selling the remaining stock, both editions, and its the only place you can pick it up.  There will be no further editions of the book beyond this.  Also be sure to check out the mini-screenprints.

Enjoy!

Click to download (direct link to pdf, right-click to save)

WOW! This is pretty fabulous! Thanks Brian. :)

For anyone who tried downloading this the other day, we noticed the URL resulted in an error page in some browsers because some characters in the link were capitalized when they should have been lowercase. Try this instead: http://www.brianwood.com/pd2.pdf

Permalink

brianwood:

I am offering a free download of the entire 132-page Public Domain 2 artbook.  It’s about 115 megs, nicely high res, and looks great imported onto my iphone and ipad.  It represents about a decade of sketches and random art.
If you like it, please pick up a copy of the signed and numbered ltd ed print book!  Khepri’s selling the remaining stock, both editions, and its the only place you can pick it up.  There will be no further editions of the book beyond this.  Also be sure to check out the mini-screenprints.
Enjoy!
Click to download (direct link to pdf, right-click to save)

WOW! This is pretty fabulous! Thanks Brian. :)

brianwood:

I am offering a free download of the entire 132-page Public Domain 2 artbook.  It’s about 115 megs, nicely high res, and looks great imported onto my iphone and ipad.  It represents about a decade of sketches and random art.

If you like it, please pick up a copy of the signed and numbered ltd ed print book!  Khepri’s selling the remaining stock, both editions, and its the only place you can pick it up.  There will be no further editions of the book beyond this.  Also be sure to check out the mini-screenprints.

Enjoy!

Click to download (direct link to pdf, right-click to save)

WOW! This is pretty fabulous! Thanks Brian. :)

Permalink
Artscape president and CEO Tim Jones spends his days finding and creating spaces around the city for artists. His big idea for Toronto would be to give artists the tools – under one roof – to develop the business side of their work. Founded in 1986, Artscape grew out of the Toronto Arts Council’s recognition that it needed to defend artists’ live-work space. Since then, the not-for-profit has been working against the forces of gentrification to maintain affordable studio space.
Permalink

Olly Moss has put together a Blogger page to display most of the pieces from his recent massive Paper Cuts solo show of cut paper silhouettes of pop culture icons. It’s remarkable how recognizable they are — there are only a few that stumped me.

Permalink

Cloudy Collection is excited to announce our latest special edition print set, honoring and including the inimitable Ed Emberley. There are two “Monster Parade”-themed prints available: one 8”x10” four-color letterpress made exclusively for Cloudy Collection by Ed Emberley, and the other is a set of fifteen (plus one!) 4”x6” four-color screen prints by Ed Emberley, his daughter Rebecca Emberley, S. Britt, Tad Carpenter, Maura Cluthe, Becky Dreistadt, Bob Flynn, Meg Hunt, David Huyck, John Martz, Caleb Neelon, ;Heather Ross, Souther Salazar, Bwana Spoons, and Nate Wragg.

A portion of the sales of these prints will go to Heifer International, providing reliable sources of food to women and families in developing nations, and to the Central Asia Institute, which provides books and literacy and educational opportunities to girls and women in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

This special edition was made possible by the awesome and incredible Annie Koyama of Koyama Press. Get one or the other or both sets right now at Cloudy Collection!