Posts tagged art history

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Conference panel on the Art History of Illustration

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I’d like to invite people in the New York region this week to attend a FREE discussion on the art history of illustration:

The Association of Historians of American Art at the College Art Association hosts

The Art History of American Periodical Illustration

5:30 pm, Thursday Feb. 14
Sutton Parlor South, 2nd Floor, Hilton Hotel, Manhattan


Chaired by: Jaleen Grove and Doug B. Dowd,
Papers by:
Page Knox, Douglas B. Dowd, Jarrod Waetjen, Jennifer A. Greenhill
Discussant: Michele H. Bogart

image credit: Harry Beckhoff, 1941

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A nice collection of old bookplates over at BibliOdyssey, which remains one of the richest resources on the Internet.

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Émile Cohl’s Fantasmagorie, from 1908, considered to be the first animated cartoon.

(Source: youtube.com)

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J.C. Leyendecker up close
Illustrator Scott Anderson spent some time studying a few original Leyendecker covers for the Saturday Evening Post, and has posted a series of close-up photos on his blog. Clicking through to the full-res images reveals an incredible amount of detail, allowing you to truly study Leyendecker’s brushstrokes.

J.C. Leyendecker up close

Illustrator Scott Anderson spent some time studying a few original Leyendecker covers for the Saturday Evening Post, and has posted a series of close-up photos on his blog. Clicking through to the full-res images reveals an incredible amount of detail, allowing you to truly study Leyendecker’s brushstrokes.

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Great Flickr set of Magic Lantern slides.

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Recently found: original 1941 concept sketches for Wonder Woman.
Here we have a piece of comic book history from early-1941 in the form of a letter from cartoonist Harry G. Peter, written to William Moulton Marston, in which he unveils some very early sketches of Marston’s new superheroine, Wonder Woman; Marston’s handwritten response to Peter can also be seen, penned in red below the original message. Wonder Woman’s subsequent debut came just months later - December - in All Star Comics #8 (cover). The rest is history. Transcript follows. (via Letters of Note: The birth of Wonder Woman)
ps: This sketch recently sold for $33,350. Yowza!

Recently found: original 1941 concept sketches for Wonder Woman.

Here we have a piece of comic book history from early-1941 in the form of a letter from cartoonist Harry G. Peter, written to William Moulton Marston, in which he unveils some very early sketches of Marston’s new superheroine, Wonder Woman; Marston’s handwritten response to Peter can also be seen, penned in red below the original message. Wonder Woman’s subsequent debut came just months later - December - in All Star Comics #8 (cover). The rest is history. Transcript follows. (via Letters of Note: The birth of Wonder Woman)

ps: This sketch recently sold for $33,350. Yowza!

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Letters of Note: How to Train an Animator, by Walt Disney
A letter written by Walt Disney in 1935 to Don Graham, tasking him with organizing art classes for the Disney animators. To put the timing in perspective, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was released in 1937, and Pinocchio and Fantasia in 1940.
Disney was a business tycoon, but he understood his business was in storytelling and emotion. From the letter:
Comedy, to be appreciated, must have contact with the audience. This we all know, but sometimes forget. By contact, I mean that there must be a familiar, sub-conscious association. Somewhere, or at some time, the audience has felt, or met with, or seen, or dreamt, the situation pictured. A study of the best gags and audience reaction we have had, will prove that the action or situation is something based on an imaginative experience or a direct life connection. This is what I mean by contact with the audience. When the action or the business loses its contact, it becomes silly and meaningless to the audience.

Letters of Note: How to Train an Animator, by Walt Disney

A letter written by Walt Disney in 1935 to Don Graham, tasking him with organizing art classes for the Disney animators. To put the timing in perspective, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was released in 1937, and Pinocchio and Fantasia in 1940.

Disney was a business tycoon, but he understood his business was in storytelling and emotion. From the letter:

Comedy, to be appreciated, must have contact with the audience. This we all know, but sometimes forget. By contact, I mean that there must be a familiar, sub-conscious association. Somewhere, or at some time, the audience has felt, or met with, or seen, or dreamt, the situation pictured. A study of the best gags and audience reaction we have had, will prove that the action or situation is something based on an imaginative experience or a direct life connection. This is what I mean by contact with the audience. When the action or the business loses its contact, it becomes silly and meaningless to the audience.
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The Anatomy Lecture of Nicolaes Tulp (by Scott Campbell)
While I think this image speaks for itself, check out Scott’s process documented on his blog.

The Anatomy Lecture of Nicolaes Tulp (by Scott Campbell)

While I think this image speaks for itself, check out Scott’s process documented on his blog.