Posts tagged Video Games

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coryschmitz:

Identity for NYU Game Center X Attract Modethe collaboration of NYU Game Center & Attract Mode.

Corey Schmitz gets better with everything he does, and he was already plenty good. I also really like his identity work for Venus Patrol

(via coryschmitz)

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This Pixeljam/James Kochalka video game looks just great.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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idrawnintendo:

Inspired by Costume Quest—a fantastic Halloween game that you can go grab right now for 50% off on Steam—which came out back in 2010 and has since been a part of my yearly Halloween tradition.

I love Zac Gorman AND I love Costume Quest! Two great tastes that taste great together! Another two great tastes are Tasha Harris and Nathan Stapley and Gabe Miller (actually three tastes), who not only were the two (+1 = 3) driving forces behind the Halloween-themed Costume Quest and it’s spinoff Grubbins On Ice, but also are cartoonists who do their own comics (click on their names for their respective comics sites). Another two great tastes that taste great together are, of course, chocolate and peanut butter.

idrawnintendo:

Inspired by Costume Quest—a fantastic Halloween game that you can go grab right now for 50% off on Steam—which came out back in 2010 and has since been a part of my yearly Halloween tradition.

I love Zac Gorman AND I love Costume Quest! Two great tastes that taste great together! Another two great tastes are Tasha Harris and Nathan Stapley and Gabe Miller (actually three tastes), who not only were the two (+1 = 3) driving forces behind the Halloween-themed Costume Quest and it’s spinoff Grubbins On Ice, but also are cartoonists who do their own comics (click on their names for their respective comics sites). Another two great tastes that taste great together are, of course, chocolate and peanut butter.

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I love this! Jed Henry combines two of his loves: traditional Japanese print art and classic Nintendo games. You can see more of them on his blog and tumblr.

I love this! Jed Henry combines two of his loves: traditional Japanese print art and classic Nintendo games. You can see more of them on his blog and tumblr.

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If Don Bluth and Chuck Jones spawned a son and gave him a tablet you’d get Cory Loftis. Cory is a visual development artist for Walt Disney Animation. Before that he was lead artist for Carbine a video game company out of southern California. The game Wildstar is very much influenced by his style.  Lots more funny, kinetic, and down-right-appealing art on his blog.

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If you’re a fan of the iOS (and now PC) game Sword & Sworcery (and why wouldn’t you be?), you’ll be interested to know that the game makers at Capy and Superbrothers are inviting you to Create in the Key of #Sworcery:

BRIEF: create artwork, sounds & whatever else in the key of #sworcery
EVENT: jam alongside Superbrothers, Capy & Jim Guthrie on Friday, May 11th - 13th
DEADLINE: submit before the end of Sunday, May 13th 2012 & we’ll make some noise

Follow the official #Sworcery Tumblr to see/hear all the jams.

If you’re a fan of the iOS (and now PC) game Sword & Sworcery (and why wouldn’t you be?), you’ll be interested to know that the game makers at Capy and Superbrothers are inviting you to Create in the Key of #Sworcery:

  • BRIEF: create artwork, sounds & whatever else in the key of #sworcery
  • EVENT: jam alongside Superbrothers, Capy & Jim Guthrie on Friday, May 11th - 13th
  • DEADLINE: submit before the end of Sunday, May 13th 2012 & we’ll make some noise

Follow the official #Sworcery Tumblr to see/hear all the jams.

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I got a press release in my inbox about the NFB’s interactive film Bla Bla by Vincent Morisset winning some Webby awards, and while I usually trash press releases with extreme prejudice, and I think the Webby awards aren’t particularly noteworthy, I think Bla Bla is simply wonderful, and the kind of interactive art I can get behind. So it’s a good enough reason as any to bring the film to your attention if you haven’t experienced it yet.
It also makes a fine companion/chaser to playing Botanicula.

I got a press release in my inbox about the NFB’s interactive film Bla Bla by Vincent Morisset winning some Webby awards, and while I usually trash press releases with extreme prejudice, and I think the Webby awards aren’t particularly noteworthy, I think Bla Bla is simply wonderful, and the kind of interactive art I can get behind. So it’s a good enough reason as any to bring the film to your attention if you haven’t experienced it yet.

It also makes a fine companion/chaser to playing Botanicula.

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I recently played the heck out of Botanicula, the follow-up to Amantia Design’s Machinarium (which may be my favourite game ever).

These are classic point-and-click puzzle adventures, with impeccable production design and perfectly realized little worlds. All gaming should be so pleasant and engrossing.

I got it has part of the Humble Bundle, which expires soon, but it’s a good way to get it cheap (pay what you want) and get some other beautifully illustrated/designed games (Machinarium included) and a movie thrown in for free.

(Source: youtube.com)

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A great interview with Sam & Max creator (and co-director of Pixar’s Brave) Steve Purcell.

A great interview with Sam & Max creator (and co-director of Pixar’s Brave) Steve Purcell.

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Fox Retro (by PUNGA)

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Animator Ed Barrett created these animated kill scenes for the fun little iPhone game Ready Steady Bang

Such a perfect mix of minimalist design and good animation. It’s such a simple game — a cowboy duel — but these little animated moments are the perfect reward for winning a round.

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Luke Pearson’s Everything We Miss from Nobrow is a remarkably mature follow-up to his all-ages debut, Hildafolk.
The story, printed in orange, black, and a beautiful warm grey, chronicles a dying relationship and the strange supernatural happenings going on all around us that go unnoticed.
And speaking of Luke Pearson and the supernatural, if you haven’t already, you simply must play The End, a philosophical platformer video game that asks young people big questions about death and mortality — all of it illustrated by Luke. It’s like taking control of a character from one of his comics and getting to explore his or her world.

Luke Pearson’s Everything We Miss from Nobrow is a remarkably mature follow-up to his all-ages debut, Hildafolk.

The story, printed in orange, black, and a beautiful warm grey, chronicles a dying relationship and the strange supernatural happenings going on all around us that go unnoticed.

And speaking of Luke Pearson and the supernatural, if you haven’t already, you simply must play The End, a philosophical platformer video game that asks young people big questions about death and mortality — all of it illustrated by Luke. It’s like taking control of a character from one of his comics and getting to explore his or her world.

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The End: Pre-release trailer (by Preloaded)

A game with art by Luke Pearson? Sign me up!

Edit: Dang, no embedding allowed. Well, check it out anyhow!

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A super fun gaming-inspired music video by Mike Scott.

Be sure not to miss Mike’s making-of video in which he details the process of creating the video from start to finish. (A second making-of video of extras exists, too)

(Source: vimeo.com)

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Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery EP from Toronto’s Superbrothers and Capybara Games is the video game I always wanted but didn’t know I wanted until it existed. I’ve hyped the game pre-release in the past, but now that’s out (it’s been available on the iPad for weeks, but today it is available for iPhones and iPods Touch), I am happy to report that it’s a wonderful, unique gaming experience — pixelly, musical, funny, stylish, and strangely immersive. 

My own work is heavily influenced by the style, humour, and pacing in the old pixelly Sierra adventure game Space Quest 2. I played it start-to-finish repeatedly as a kid, and it’s a style of game I am sad has fallen out of favour with the advent of first person shooters and 3D graphics. It was a game that involved reading and taking an active part in a narrative. And casually exploring the 2D environments was like being able to walk around a picture book. It’s a game that dropped you into a world that you had figure out on your own through exploration and play.

Enter Sword & Sworcery, and that feeling is back. With its singular artistic vision (Craig D Adams aka Superbrothers), its short tweet-sized text elements, and its minimal style in both design and gameplay, Sworcery almost has more in common with comics and picture books than it does with most of today’s crop of videogames. I hope it inspires and influences more games of its kind. It is a poem when other games aim to be epic novels.

It’s a narrative experience that Craig calls I/O Cinema, and it somehow succeeds where motion comics and other forms of interactive fiction have failed, mainly by not trying to be a digital version of something else.

I must also mention that much of the game’s success is due to musician Jim Guthrie's contributions; the music and sound effects take this slow-paced, meditative walking-around game and make it epic and beautiful. Animators take note: good music and sound design does half your job for you.

App Store links: Universal version for iPad and iPhone | Micro version for iPhone & iPod Touch

Here’s another spoilery video to whet your appetite:

(Source: vimeo.com)

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