Posts tagged Koyama Press

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neo-rama:

arecomicsevengood:

Koyama Press is putting out issue 3 of Ryan Cecil Smith’s S.F. later this year.

!!!

Ryan Cecil Smith is one of my favorite cartoonists, period, and S.F. is at the top of my must-buy list—you can still get #1 and 2, along with the excellent S.F. Supplementary File(s), at his site. Very excited to see him get the Koyaman treatment. I don’t know who designed that cover, but oo-wee!

neo-rama:

arecomicsevengood:

Koyama Press is putting out issue 3 of Ryan Cecil Smith’s S.F. later this year.

!!!

Ryan Cecil Smith is one of my favorite cartoonists, period, and S.F. is at the top of my must-buy list—you can still get #1 and 2, along with the excellent S.F. Supplementary File(s), at his site. Very excited to see him get the Koyaman treatment. I don’t know who designed that cover, but oo-wee!

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kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?
A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 
In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.
It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 
Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.
Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?

A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 

In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.

It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 

Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.

Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

(via kingtrash-deactivated20140610)

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lukeperson:

My version of Kickass Annie, the logo/mascot of the awesome Koyama Press

Lovely!

lukeperson:

My version of Kickass Annie, the logo/mascot of the awesome Koyama Press

Lovely!

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Yesterday on Twitter, Anthony Clark suggested that people should draw Steve Wolfhard’s Cat Rackham to celebrate the release of Steve’s new book from Koyama Press, Cat Rackham Loses It. Steve has posted the results in a Flickr set of over 100 drawings.

Shown here: Jon Klassen, Kyle Jones, Vera Brosgol, Chuck Groenink, and, in some sort of zombie miracle, Charles Schulz.

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Trexels - Star Trek Pixel Art by John Martz and Koyama Press
I made this print with Koyama Press, featuring 235 Star Trek characters in pixelated form. Can you name them all? We’re giving away two copies to the Trekkies with the best guesses. The print debuts at MoCCA in New York this weekend, and then officially goes on sale a week from today.

Trexels - Star Trek Pixel Art by John Martz and Koyama Press

I made this print with Koyama Press, featuring 235 Star Trek characters in pixelated form. Can you name them all? We’re giving away two copies to the Trekkies with the best guesses. The print debuts at MoCCA in New York this weekend, and then officially goes on sale a week from today.

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May is going to be so much fun! Check out this trailer for Elio's new book, published by Koyama Press, and set to debut at TCAF!

Elio’s blog.: Monster Party! Book Trailer.

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It’s looking like Michael DeForge will maintain his fantastic batting average. This new offering through Koyama Press looks stunning. I won’t be at Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Fest where it will debut, but you can bet I’ll be snapping it up once he makes it available online.
Spotting Deer – Koyama Press « King Trash

It’s looking like Michael DeForge will maintain his fantastic batting average. This new offering through Koyama Press looks stunning. I won’t be at Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Fest where it will debut, but you can bet I’ll be snapping it up once he makes it available online.

Spotting Deer – Koyama Press « King Trash

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Diary Comics #1 by Dustin Harbin
Are you reading Dustin Harbin's comics yet? The first volume of his Diary Comics from Koyama Press is one of my favourite books of the year.

As with other diary comics — and I’m thinking of James Kochalka’s American Elf here — their strength is in numbers. It can be difficult to make every day seem interesting, and minutae can only take one so far. But when you read all of them together as a whole, suddenly you’ve got something far greater — like puzzle pieces coming together to form a larger picture. And in the case of Dustin, you can also see how his rhythms and even the art improve over time as he settles into the practice.
Art directors, take note. Judging by the quality of the sketches he includes in each book, he has far too much time on his hands, and not enough illustration gigs. Get on that.

Diary Comics #1 by Dustin Harbin

Are you reading Dustin Harbin's comics yet? The first volume of his Diary Comics from Koyama Press is one of my favourite books of the year.

As with other diary comics — and I’m thinking of James Kochalka’s American Elf here — their strength is in numbers. It can be difficult to make every day seem interesting, and minutae can only take one so far. But when you read all of them together as a whole, suddenly you’ve got something far greater — like puzzle pieces coming together to form a larger picture. And in the case of Dustin, you can also see how his rhythms and even the art improve over time as he settles into the practice.

Art directors, take note. Judging by the quality of the sketches he includes in each book, he has far too much time on his hands, and not enough illustration gigs. Get on that.

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Kick Ass Annie Gallery
Annie Koyama’s growing collection of artist interpretations of Koyama Press’s Kick Ass Annie mascot (designed by Aaron Leighton).
The roster of artists includes Chris Kuzma (shown here), Michael DeForge, Hellen Jo, Jim Rugg, Britt Wilson, and yours truly.

Kick Ass Annie Gallery

Annie Koyama’s growing collection of artist interpretations of Koyama Press’s Kick Ass Annie mascot (designed by Aaron Leighton).

The roster of artists includes Chris Kuzma (shown here), Michael DeForge, Hellen Jo, Jim Rugg, Britt Wilson, and yours truly.