Posts tagged Kate Beaton

Want more like this? Try searching the Archives for Kate Beaton.


Permalink

Kate Beaton answers your questions about makin’ comics

beatonna:

Hey there!  It’s question and answer time!

A few weeks ago I put out an open call for questions about the comics industry.  A penance maybe, for having so many unanswered emails on these kinds of topics.  I’m sorry!  My email is terrible.

Anyway: I said I would answer the most frequently asked questions, to the best of my ability.  This isn’t a book on how to make comics, I can only speak from my own experience (in some places this will be painfully obvious), so keep that in mind.    Questions came from all over the spectrum of artists, so if you are, say, a teenager and read an answer that seems crazy inapplicable, I possibly had another type of person in mind when I typed the answer. 

This is part one, part two will have the big two questions that I got asked most of all- “how do I get people to read my comic” and “how do I generate an income.”  Anyway I’m still talking, as usual, too much of that, let’s get going.

(hope you like my meandering answers, I love meandering like babies love their mommas)


Read More

Permalink

I’ll take a wild guess and say that because you’re reading this on a comics & illustration blog, you’re already familiar with Kate Beaton’s comics. I’ll also guess, since it’s been reviewed everywhere from NPR to Time Magazine that you also already know about her new book with Drawn & Quarterly, on sale today.
I’ll refrain from reviewing the book itself, which is a nice, big, beautiful, hilarious thing because there’s not much I can say that Dustin Harbin didn’t already put so perfectly in his review.
But I did want to draw attention to the book because I know that readers of this site are cartoonists themselves, both professional and aspiring.  Kate’s book, which topped the comics and graphic novel sales chart on Amazon well before it was even released, is a notable Internet success story, and it’s worth trying to steal her secrets.
Okay, yes, talent. Talent aside — and she has it in boatloads — I think Kate’s secret is in how thoughtful a cartoonist she is. It’s a thoughtfulness that informs her work, and gives her the observational skills that allows her to capture the expressions, emotions, body language, and speech patterns of real people that makes her comics about historical and literary characters so funny.
But if you know Kate, have seen her speak, or follow her on Twitter, you’ll know it’s her thoughtfulness that also gives her autobiographical comics such heart, her thoughtfulness that gives her opinions on comics, humour, art, and culture such weight, and her thoughtfulness that makes her fans love her:

Let’s all buy her book.
EDIT: Here’s our first post about Kate from 2007.

I’ll take a wild guess and say that because you’re reading this on a comics & illustration blog, you’re already familiar with Kate Beaton’s comics. I’ll also guess, since it’s been reviewed everywhere from NPR to Time Magazine that you also already know about her new book with Drawn & Quarterly, on sale today.

I’ll refrain from reviewing the book itself, which is a nice, big, beautiful, hilarious thing because there’s not much I can say that Dustin Harbin didn’t already put so perfectly in his review.

But I did want to draw attention to the book because I know that readers of this site are cartoonists themselves, both professional and aspiring.  Kate’s book, which topped the comics and graphic novel sales chart on Amazon well before it was even released, is a notable Internet success story, and it’s worth trying to steal her secrets.

Okay, yes, talent. Talent aside — and she has it in boatloads — I think Kate’s secret is in how thoughtful a cartoonist she is. It’s a thoughtfulness that informs her work, and gives her the observational skills that allows her to capture the expressions, emotions, body language, and speech patterns of real people that makes her comics about historical and literary characters so funny.

But if you know Kate, have seen her speak, or follow her on Twitter, you’ll know it’s her thoughtfulness that also gives her autobiographical comics such heart, her thoughtfulness that gives her opinions on comics, humour, art, and culture such weight, and her thoughtfulness that makes her fans love her:

Let’s all buy her book.

EDIT: Here’s our first post about Kate from 2007.

Permalink

Yes, I know. Kickstarter projects are popping up like pimples on a nervous teenager these days, and I know many of us are starting to feel the pinch of constantly being asked to donate to this project or that, particularly while the economy is tanking. Regardless, this one sounds pretty exciting and is very relevant to those of us who draw for a living: 

We’re Dave Kellett & Fred Schroeder, creators of the comics documentary STRIPPED. This film is our love-letter to the art form: Bringing together 60 of the world’s best cartoonists into one extraordinary, feature-length documentary. The film sits down with creators to talk about how cartooning works, why it’s so loved, and how as artists they’re navigating this dicey period between print and digital options…when neither path works perfectly. We want this film to capture the extraordinary people behind the comics you love, to show how they work…and ask the question: “Where does the art form go from here?” 

(via STRIPPED: The Comics Documentary by Small Fish Studios — Kickstarter)

Permalink

Kate Beaton sets her sights on the world of strong female characters.

Kate Beaton sets her sights on the world of strong female characters.

Permalink
Kate Beaton Tells 'Strange Tales' About Marvel and Why Her Wonder Woman Is So Pissed Off - ComicsAlliance