Posts tagged Illustration

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It looks like Lydia Nichols has mastered her fine arts - and how! Check out these projects and more (thirteen total!) from her corner of the Good Measure MFA Thesis Exhibition at the Tyler School of Art Graphic and Interactive Design. Her colors and her facility with the printing process and layering make her work bright and crisp, and it all looks like wonderfully functional work as well. From her description of the projects:

Tyler’s program focuses heavily on authorship, so most of the projects include research, authorship, design, and illustration.

Personally, I don’t have the authority, but Lydia: you’re hired!

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peowpress:

Elliot Alfredius Ghibli Tribute. Magic Registry + 3 Colors. 

Elliot set out to create characters that would fit into an imaginary Ghibli movie. I’d say he nailed it.
More great work on his tumblr: http://elliotalfredius.tumblr.com/
And here too: http://www.peowstudio.com/elliot/

peowpress:

Elliot Alfredius Ghibli Tribute. Magic Registry + 3 Colors. 

Elliot set out to create characters that would fit into an imaginary Ghibli movie. I’d say he nailed it.

More great work on his tumblr: http://elliotalfredius.tumblr.com/

And here too: http://www.peowstudio.com/elliot/

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Adam Rex: How I Make a Picture Book

The ridiculously talented Adam Rex shares his hilarious process for picture book making. 

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Coyote by JooHee Yoon

Coyote by JooHee Yoon

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kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?
A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 
In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.
It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 
Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.
Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?

A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 

In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.

It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 

Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.

Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

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atelier-sento:

Ramen Delivery Boy7 layers linocut - handprinted
Finished!It took so much time from the original sketch to the final print… The most difficult was to coordinate the different layers during the printing, especially on the character’s face: the shape of his head is on the grey layer, his mouth on the red layer, his nose on the brown layer and his eyes/hair on the black layer, each one being carved on a different plate. So the smallest gap could ruin everything.
We have filmed the process and should be able to post a video tutorial soon. Stay tuned!

Whoa! This is by Cécile Brun & Olivier Pichard.

atelier-sento:

Ramen Delivery Boy
7 layers linocut - handprinted

Finished!
It took so much time from the original sketch to the final print… The most difficult was to coordinate the different layers during the printing, especially on the character’s face: the shape of his head is on the grey layer, his mouth on the red layer, his nose on the brown layer and his eyes/hair on the black layer, each one being carved on a different plate. So the smallest gap could ruin everything.

We have filmed the process and should be able to post a video tutorial soon. Stay tuned!

Whoa! This is by Cécile Brun & Olivier Pichard.

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I’m really digging these head renderings by Jake Panian.

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Super nice stuff by MailChimp’s Justin Pervorse. There’s much more than just monkeys by the way. 

Super nice stuff by MailChimp’s Justin Pervorse. There’s much more than just monkeys by the way. 

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Illustration Forums

Where do you go online for discussions about your craft? Are forums still playing an important role, or have we moved those conversations to Twitter or Google+ Hangouts? What is/are your favourite illustration forum(s)?

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heyoscarwilde:

Mr. Hammond, after careful consideration, I’ve decided not to endorse your park. 

Jurassic Park illustrated by Pakoto Martinez :: via pakotoo.blogspot.ca

Lots of fun stuff from Pakoto Martinez here. 

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sosuperawesome:

Mattias Adolfsson

On Tumblr

Oh man oh man oh man!

(via spx)

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Conference panel on the Art History of Illustration

image

I’d like to invite people in the New York region this week to attend a FREE discussion on the art history of illustration:

The Association of Historians of American Art at the College Art Association hosts

The Art History of American Periodical Illustration

5:30 pm, Thursday Feb. 14
Sutton Parlor South, 2nd Floor, Hilton Hotel, Manhattan


Chaired by: Jaleen Grove and Doug B. Dowd,
Papers by:
Page Knox, Douglas B. Dowd, Jarrod Waetjen, Jennifer A. Greenhill
Discussant: Michele H. Bogart

image credit: Harry Beckhoff, 1941

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Love Lust

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My heart goes out to anyone trying to have an art opening today, in the blizzard. If you are in Hamilton, get yourself out to support Charlene Chua. If you are not in Hamilton, help her out by sharing/reblogging.

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Lovely colors and great character design by Stevie Lewis, visual development artist at Dreamworks. Nice work for sale in her Etsy shop, too.
(via Stevie Ray)

Lovely colors and great character design by Stevie Lewis, visual development artist at Dreamworks. Nice work for sale in her Etsy shop, too.

(via Stevie Ray)

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sirmitchell:

SUPER series 2 is available until 11:59 PM PST tonight, then they are gone for good. 
If you buy two, I will throw in a SUPER Krang for free. My personal fave. 

I love Mike Mitchell SO MUCH; discovering his work has been a joy, but not nearly as nice as discovering him as a human being. He’s made me reconsider how popular culture can inform art and image-making in a way that transcends ideas of fanart or appropriation. ANYway he has a new series of prints out. More info here. 

sirmitchell:

SUPER series 2 is available until 11:59 PM PST tonight, then they are gone for good. 

If you buy two, I will throw in a SUPER Krang for free. My personal fave

I love Mike Mitchell SO MUCH; discovering his work has been a joy, but not nearly as nice as discovering him as a human being. He’s made me reconsider how popular culture can inform art and image-making in a way that transcends ideas of fanart or appropriation. ANYway he has a new series of prints out. More info here

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