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neo-rama:

arecomicsevengood:

Koyama Press is putting out issue 3 of Ryan Cecil Smith’s S.F. later this year.

!!!

Ryan Cecil Smith is one of my favorite cartoonists, period, and S.F. is at the top of my must-buy list—you can still get #1 and 2, along with the excellent S.F. Supplementary File(s), at his site. Very excited to see him get the Koyaman treatment. I don’t know who designed that cover, but oo-wee!

neo-rama:

arecomicsevengood:

Koyama Press is putting out issue 3 of Ryan Cecil Smith’s S.F. later this year.

!!!

Ryan Cecil Smith is one of my favorite cartoonists, period, and S.F. is at the top of my must-buy list—you can still get #1 and 2, along with the excellent S.F. Supplementary File(s), at his site. Very excited to see him get the Koyaman treatment. I don’t know who designed that cover, but oo-wee!

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ca-tsuka:

“Kairos” animated trailer by La Cachette studio (for the promotion of Ulysse Malassagne’s comic book)

This is pretty cool.

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kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?
A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 
In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.
It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 
Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.
Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?

A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 

In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.

It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 

Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.

Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

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austinkleon:


Milton Caniff in his studio, c. 1947 
Wow. I want to go to there.
(via @comicsreporter)

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sirmitchell:

SUPER series 2 is available until 11:59 PM PST tonight, then they are gone for good. 
If you buy two, I will throw in a SUPER Krang for free. My personal fave. 

I love Mike Mitchell SO MUCH; discovering his work has been a joy, but not nearly as nice as discovering him as a human being. He’s made me reconsider how popular culture can inform art and image-making in a way that transcends ideas of fanart or appropriation. ANYway he has a new series of prints out. More info here. 

sirmitchell:

SUPER series 2 is available until 11:59 PM PST tonight, then they are gone for good. 

If you buy two, I will throw in a SUPER Krang for free. My personal fave

I love Mike Mitchell SO MUCH; discovering his work has been a joy, but not nearly as nice as discovering him as a human being. He’s made me reconsider how popular culture can inform art and image-making in a way that transcends ideas of fanart or appropriation. ANYway he has a new series of prints out. More info here

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Barrel of Monkeys

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Barrel of Monkeys is the first book from new publisher Rebus Books, and as far as I know the first wide English publication of work by the team of Florent Ruppert and Jérôme Mulot.

What to say about this book? I did not expect to like it nearly as much as I did. It seemed esoteric and vaguely arch when I first flipped through it, although maybe—as an uneducated person—that’s just me being mistrustful of anything/everything that seems smarter than I am. And the book was esoteric, and more than vaguely arch. It was weird and strange and profane and gross and occasionally shocking and definitely one of the best comics I’ve read in the last year. It’s a human book; it’s a book about human beings and how stupid and crude and terrible we are, and it’s hilarious.

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Barrel of Monkeys is drawn by both Ruppert and Mulot together in, according to the back cover, “a shared visual style.” It’s a little bit like a gestural, scratchy version of a clear-line style: there’s just enough information there for your mind to latch onto and follow, but little enough that you are forced to continually work to apprehend what’s happening. In order to read the pages, you have to fully engage with them, and the book depends on this leaned-forward attention of the reader to deliver it’s short, quick, crystalline jabs in each story.

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The effect is amplified and redoubled by the formal tricks Ruppert and Mulot use: from piling speech balloons all over a page so you can’t tell who’s speaking (or when) and so have to ferret it out for yourself, to more involved tricks. For instance the phenakistoscopes—complex circular images designed to rotate around a central axis in order to produce an animated effect. There are numerous phenakistoscopes throughout the book, each punctuating something happening within a story. When I came across them in reading the book, they seemed a little overwrought, more or less destroying the flow of the reading; which is not unusual for overtly formalist tools in comics. But following the suggestion of the book, you can see them animated here, and wow. Even days after reading the book, seeing the animations now (because I didn’t stop reading in order to watch animations on my phone (for once)), each of them really does add something, each one is a perfect beautiful little weird gem.

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But why do it like that? Seeing a single flat drawing meant to be animated, in the context of a multi-page comics story, creates a weird, dissonant parallax. “What is this? Where does this go in the story, in the sequence, or in my brain?” There’s a lot of that in Barrel of Monkeys, and I’d be surprised if it weren’t fully intended. The drawings are beautiful and light and airy, but there’s only enough information, especially in the faces, for you to tell characters apart. Who they are is less important than what they’re doing, saying or thinking. They often seem like not much more than ciphers, banal in the extreme, acting out a series of clumsy rudenesses. The strange, often terrible actions of the people in these stories stands in stark contrast with their blurry forms and smeared personalities. Though it’s a black and white book, there’s very little actual black, in terms of a compositional tool that moves the eye around a page purposefully. Florent and Mulot seem determined to let you founder until they feel it’s time to drag you up.

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I spent most of my time reading Barrel of Monkeys squinting, both figuratively and sometimes literally, to discern what was actually happening, and so was unprepared over and over again for how everything was wrapped up into a perfectly precise knot by the end. The story of the duel that happens to take place at an international meeting of sword swallowers by itself is worth the price of the entire book. I didn’t read the back until I was done, and Dash Shaw’s blurb says it perfectly:

“When I’d get Ruppert and Mulot’s books in French, I was perplexed by comics that seemed largely informed by theatre, Eadweard Muybridge and proto-animation. Now that I can read it, I’m delighted by how evil and mean-spirited the work is.”

I loved this book. And it’s a really great launch for Rebus Books, run by writer and critic Bill Kartalopoulos. Now the only problem is waiting for more Ruppert and Mulot in English.

112 pages
6.5 x 9.5” bw softcover
ISBN 978-0-615-62235-4
$19.95 | buy from publisher | buy via Amazon

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I recently went through the mammoth slithering piles of comics and books and minis I got and/or was given this year, and culled out the ones I didn’t have room for, organized the rest, and was left with a great big reading pile to start the new year. This one, Top 5 Boardroom Techniques by Chris Kuzma, was one of my favorite “gets” from CAKE, and cracked me up just as much flipping through it again. Some of my favorite minis are in this mode, a quickly delivered idea that grows larger somehow outside the context of a larger collection or smushed in with a bunch of other work in an anthology. 

This is not only a hilarious (and short) (but cheap) little mini, it’s a great introduction to Chris’s work—he’s also a member of Wowee Zonk with Ginette Lapalme and Patrick Kyle, and—conflict-of-interest alert—published by my own publisher, Koyama Press. You should just consider that extra endorsement though, and go ahead and buy the $1 mini

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reliablecomics:

80. January Again Already
I’m still working on this one, those last two panels are a little dark.
David King www.reliablecomics.com

An early look at the next Reliable Comic. David King is one of my favorite cartoonists on the planet, and takes my breath away over and over and over again. More at his site, plus his hilariously cynical Crime World strip at the excellent Study Group site. And if you’ve never read his Lemon Styles comic, it’s one of my favorite comics ever. Ever! Gush gush gush!!

reliablecomics:

80. January Again Already

I’m still working on this one, those last two panels are a little dark.

David King www.reliablecomics.com

An early look at the next Reliable Comic. David King is one of my favorite cartoonists on the planet, and takes my breath away over and over and over again. More at his site, plus his hilariously cynical Crime World strip at the excellent Study Group site. And if you’ve never read his Lemon Styles comic, it’s one of my favorite comics ever. Ever! Gush gush gush!!

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samhiti:

DEATH RATTLE (UPDATED)  This is the final.

Sam just listed this thing as a new print, and whoa nellie. If you’re not already deep into Sam’s work, or Once Upon A Time in the West, this is a great reason to bellyflop into one or both. 

samhiti:

DEATH RATTLE 

(UPDATED)  This is the final.

Sam just listed this thing as a new print, and whoa nellie. If you’re not already deep into Sam’s work, or Once Upon A Time in the West, this is a great reason to bellyflop into one or both. 

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Two comics subscription services that were closed at the time I mentioned them in my Best of 2012 post have both been re-opened. Both Oily Comics and Patrick Kyle’s Distance Mover are accepting subscription orders, so get on it!

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My friend and yours Mike Mitchell has a lot of talents, but he’s particularly good at revisiting iconic images—or even just clothes—in a way that’s respectful and gently mocking at the same time. His current series of “SUPER” prints, modeled after the classic Superman pose, is available until midnight tonight (December 4th 2012) as a grab bag. I have some of Mike’s prints, enough actually that it’s starting to get a little creepy. Mike’s shop is here, and his Tumblr is here. 

My friend and yours Mike Mitchell has a lot of talents, but he’s particularly good at revisiting iconic images—or even just clothes—in a way that’s respectful and gently mocking at the same time. His current series of “SUPER” prints, modeled after the classic Superman pose, is available until midnight tonight (December 4th 2012) as a grab bag. I have some of Mike’s prints, enough actually that it’s starting to get a little creepy. Mike’s shop is here, and his Tumblr is here

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johnmartz:

For the third consecutive year I designed the poster for the National Cartoonist Society Foundation’s Jay Kennedy Scholarship for Cartooning.
The deadline is fast approaching — applications must be postmarked by December 15th, 2012. Any North American student who will be in their junior or senior year of college or university during the 2013-2014 academic year is eligible. You do not have to be an art major. More information at www.cartoonistfoundation.org

This is a great opportunity for any student who draws comics, does animation, or dabbles in any sort of cartooning. Only a few days left to get your application in the mail!

johnmartz:

For the third consecutive year I designed the poster for the National Cartoonist Society Foundation’s Jay Kennedy Scholarship for Cartooning.

The deadline is fast approaching — applications must be postmarked by December 15th, 2012. Any North American student who will be in their junior or senior year of college or university during the 2013-2014 academic year is eligible. You do not have to be an art major. More information at www.cartoonistfoundation.org

This is a great opportunity for any student who draws comics, does animation, or dabbles in any sort of cartooning. Only a few days left to get your application in the mail!

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The Hawkeye Initiative

About 12 years ago for a class project in art school I argued that sexism was not inherently embedded in the female nude in art (or images of women, period, as argued by the hardcore feminists there), but coded in the poses. Wish I’d thought of the following to make my point: The Hawkeye Initiative exposes what we’re so used to seeing that we don’t notice any more. It shows the ludicrous and the sexploitative in comics by replacing heroines with the buff Hawkeye character in the same pose—-drawn by whoever wants to participate, with some pretty hilarious results.

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sirmitchell:

Super - Series 1 
Next week I’m trying something different. I’ll be selling a “grab bag” of three signed 4”x6” prints, which will include two common, and one uncommon/rare. 
They will be on sale for 24 hours at some point early next week. Each “grab bag” will be available for $35. There will also be a golden ticket in a random order which can be redeemed for the entire Super - Series 2 set. 
I really enjoyed making these, and whether or not I sell 3 or 300, I’ll be making more!

So great. Nice work, as usual, Mike Mitchell.

sirmitchell:

Super - Series 1 

Next week I’m trying something different. I’ll be selling a “grab bag” of three signed 4”x6” prints, which will include two common, and one uncommon/rare. 

They will be on sale for 24 hours at some point early next week. Each “grab bag” will be available for $35. There will also be a golden ticket in a random order which can be redeemed for the entire Super - Series 2 set. 

I really enjoyed making these, and whether or not I sell 3 or 300, I’ll be making more!

So great. Nice work, as usual, Mike Mitchell.

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