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I have a lot of respect for Ze Frank, and I adored his year-long project, The Show. So many people have said things similar to this, but it’s always a good thing to hear again. In summary: if you want to make stuff, make stuff. It’s the only way you’ll get past the point of making things to the point of having made stuff. Then you get to make more stuff. So go make stuff!

Thoughts on the Creative Career (by zefrankenfriends)

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kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?
A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 
In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.
It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 
Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.
Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

kingtrash:

Here’s a cover that’s going unused for a 2014 project, the official details of which will drop a long while from now. I usually draw two or three covers for anything before settling on the final one. The publisher was (understandably) a little uneasy about how legible my lettering was, so we decided to put this in the bin and start work on a new one. I thought I’d post it over here as an excuse to write about some “process” stuff. Maybe this is super boring?

A friend pointed out to me that the past few covers I’ve designed (including this one, and some others which haven’t been posted yet) have become increasingly difficult to read. I sort of forget that my impulses as a designer don’t always intersect with the needs of a publisher, retailer, etc, who are the ones who actually have to sell my junk. My design sense was shaped largely by gig posters and record covers, where the point wasn’t really about accessibility, but drawing specific people in - and to a certain degree, keeping lames out. 

In fact, I’m usually concerned my covers are overly conservative (in both type and layout) compared to the designs that influenced me the most in high school and college. That was an anxiety I had about the cover above, right after finishing it, but before e-mailing it off. Legibility aside, I made some really sissy choices in terms of layout and colour. But I’m a fairly conservative cartoonist anyway, so maybe that’s appropriate. I make similarly sissy choices in my actual comics.

It probably wasn’t until a year or two ago where I felt confident enough in my lettering to push it to be as unreadable as I felt like - to just take pleasure in drawing the letterforms themselves. 

Bonus fact: This title was stolen from an Andy Milligan movie.

Part one of a five billion-part series on my anxieties as a “designer”

The great Michael Deforge on type, legibility, art and its various uses beyond “art.”

(via kingtrash-deactivated20140610)

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Annette Jung of Berlin animation studio Talking Animals created “Lego Dance,” a 30-second animation of Michael Jackson dancing, using only LEGO bricks. (via Laughing Squid)

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kyletwebster:

Attention, digital artists - I will be selling a Photoshop 6 brush pack soon with paint and ink brushes that I have been using for my professional assignments over the past few years. The ‘Kyle’s Ultimate Soft Oil Brush’ was used for the sketch above. It’s a doozy! Stay tuned for details. Please tell your friends!

Y’all are gonna want these.

kyletwebster:

Attention, digital artists - I will be selling a Photoshop 6 brush pack soon with paint and ink brushes that I have been using for my professional assignments over the past few years. The ‘Kyle’s Ultimate Soft Oil Brush’ was used for the sketch above. It’s a doozy! Stay tuned for details. Please tell your friends!

Y’all are gonna want these.

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Picture This! | French Culture

Many prominent French children’s book illustrators coming to NY to give talks Apr 8-May 17.

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They sure don’t make them like they used to, for better and for worse. The innovation and sheer people-power at the start of the industry is mind-melting, and along with Disney, Fleischer Studios was at the forefront. Who doesn’t love a good process video, and who doesn’t love a good Popeye cartoon?
(video link)

They sure don’t make them like they used to, for better and for worse. The innovation and sheer people-power at the start of the industry is mind-melting, and along with Disney, Fleischer Studios was at the forefront. Who doesn’t love a good process video, and who doesn’t love a good Popeye cartoon?

(video link)

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My friend Ohara Hale made this sweet alphabet book for kids about pizza doing things and she made this animation about it too!

The book is in French and English so it will probably be a good way for everyone to practice their French too.

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Over the course of the two-day conference, writers and illustrators come together with publishers, editors, literary agents, and other industry professionals in celebration of children’s content from Asia and around the world. This year’s conference will have an added emphasis on Young Adult literature and children’s works in translation.
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George Lucas announces plans for museum devoted to the story-telling arts

This is BIG news. Museum for illustration, comics, digital arts, and all kinds of movie arts. Proposed for San Francisco.

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Exhibit of 1890s "little magazines"

Grolier Club

Little magazines were small-run magazines focused on specialty subjects, usually erudite or artsy, sort of the equivalent of the more involved zines of the 80s-90s, and blogs today. Exhibit runs to April 27th in NY.

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luclatulippe:

edwardjuan:

Vancouver, British Columbia  

“By Sea, Land, and Air We Prosper”

A city map of Canada’s Pacific Northwest city.  Neighborhoods from Gastown to Mount Pleasant, and local landmarks from Granville Island to the Jimmy Hendrix house.  All connected with bike trails and greenways.

Purchase it at store.forestandwaves.com

Loving this beautiful poster of my city by local illustrator/cartoonist Edward Juan. Also, I love finding out about new talent in town! 

(via luclatulippe-deactivated2013102)

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coryschmitz:

Identity for NYU Game Center X Attract Modethe collaboration of NYU Game Center & Attract Mode.

Corey Schmitz gets better with everything he does, and he was already plenty good. I also really like his identity work for Venus Patrol

(via coryschmitz)

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This anti-bullying PSA titled To This Day is narrated by Canadian poet Shane Koyczan and animated by dozens of animators each contributing 20-second segments. 

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laughingsquid:

Sign Painters, Documentary & Book About Sign Painting in America

I’m looking forward to this. Cartoonists, designers, and many more obsess over lettering, but not like these folks.

(via hifructosemag)

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I am mighty excited about the new Jim Guthrie album Takes Time.

Dan Berry created this music video for the song The Rest Is Yet To Come, and over at Dan’s site he has an informative process post detailing the various stages of its creation.

(Source: youtube.com)